Skip to main menu Skip to content
We are online to support you! Get information on Library resources and services for: Students | Instructors | Researchers. For Ryerson campus information, visit: Ryerson COVID-19 Information and Updates

Past Workshops

February 2021

Demystifying the literature review

Date: Feb. 2 
Time: 11 am -12 pm

From annotated bibliographies to literature reviews to systematic reviews, students are frequently asked to find scholarly articles about a topic and provide thoughtful analysis of what they read. This workshop will provide participants with the information they need to identify what sort of review they are doing, how to find what they need, read the material with a critical eye and keep it all organized.


Introduction to 3D design for prototyping

Date: Feb 2 
Time: 1 – 2pm

This short skill-building session will introduce beginners to 3D design software. Participants will learn the basics of 3D design for 3D printing for prototyping purposes, and be introduced to the concept of designing something to be 3D printed and other fabrication methods.

* This session is open to the Ryerson community. Beginners are welcome, no previous experience necessary.** Participants are encouraged to download Fusion 360 to follow along. Contact collab@ryerson.ca with any software-related questions.


Prototyping at home

Date: Feb. 3
Time: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Have an idea you want to turn into reality? This 1-hour session will introduce you to strategies that will help get you started with ideation and prototyping at home!

You’ll learn: 

  • Best practices for 2D and 3D visualization and ideation.
  • The basics of design thinking and how to take advantage of it.
  • Prototyping dos and don’ts
  • This beginners session is open to the Ryerson community. No previous experience required

Love Data Week: Finding Covid-19 data – an overview of Ryerson Library’s online guide

Date: Feb. 8
Time: 11 a.m.- 12 p.m.

Join Data Librarian, Kevin Manuel for an information session that will provide an overview of Covid-19 data sources that are included in the Library’s Guide for this topic. Content will cover international data sources such as the World Health Organization, Johns Hopkins University; Canadian data content such as Statistics Canada and the Province of Ontario; and local data from the City of Toronto. From this session you will be able to better understand how these resources are connected and how to access them for your research.


Demystifying the literature review

Date: Feb. 8
Time: 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

From annotated bibliographies to literature reviews to systematic reviews, students are frequently asked to find scholarly articles about a topic and provide thoughtful analysis of what they read. This workshop will provide participants with the information they need to identify what sort of review they are doing, how to find what they need, read the material with a critical eye and keep it all organized.


Academic Integrity Week: Click for a citation – how library databases can help you with citing your work. 

Date: Feb. 9
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Did you know that the Library’s website and our journal databases can help you cite your work in APA, MLA and other citation styles? This workshop will show you how to use the library’s resources to keep track of your sources and how to cite them correctly. 


Digital Restoration Techniques

Date: Feb. 9   
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Digital restoration is the process of restoring damaged artworks in a way that is not intrusive to the original piece. Library Collaboratory Digital Restoration Technician, Michael CarterArlt will lead participants through various techniques used in digital restoration and provide in-depth knowledge on how each tool is used. Real world examples will be analyzed in this session, and will demonstrate some of the techniques that were used to restore damaged manuscript leaves for the “Remastered” exhibit at the Aga Khan Museum.

* The session is open to the Ryerson community. Beginners and experts alike are welcome.

** Participants are welcome to follow along using Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop

*** Software is not required to attend this session


Legal Citation and the McGill Guide: 10 Things you Need to Know

Date: Feb. 9   
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Ryerson Library Law Librarians will walk you through McGill Guide citation, focusing on the most important rules and demystifying legal citation along the way. By the end of the session you should be comfortable with most legal citation and have a game plan for tackling more difficult citation problems.

This workshop is taught by John Papadopoulos, head of the Ryerson Law Library, and Lisa Levesque, law librarian and is intended for law students and others who use the McGill Guide for citation.


Love Data Week: Critical data literacy and COVID-19 visualizations – strategies to slow the spread of misinformation

Date: Feb. 9
Time: 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

The need to understand data visualizations has never been more important. Every day we are inundated with more Covid-19 data, graphs and charts. Some of these data visualizations are well-designed and easy to understand, and others are confusing and misleading. This workshop will cover common data visualization issues that lead to confusion and misinformation, and will use critical data literacy strategies to evaluate charts and graphs.

Academic Integrity Week: Identifying online disinformation

Date: Feb. 10
Time: 11 a.m. 12 p.m. (zoom)

This workshop will teach practical skills for identifying online disinformation quickly and effectively. Students will learn how to laterally read, giving them valuable context and saving them time to find more credible sources.


Adobe Illustrator

Date: Feb. 10
Time: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Adobe Illustrator is used to create graphics for all types of media. Whether you’re an artist,  entrepreneur, or both, Illustrator can help you visualize and communicate ideas. 

In this workshop, learn the basics of using Illustrator by creating a brand logo.

Here’s a handy Illustrator overview to get you started: Getting started with Adobe Illustrator


Love Data Week: writing a data management plan using DMP Assistant

Date: Feb. 11
Time: 11 a.m. -12 p.m.

A data management plan (DMP) is a document that outlines what data will be created, and what you will do with that data during and after your research project. Documenting a plan for your data is good practice and an integral part of responsible data management. This workshop will go through the steps of creating a data management plan using DMP Assistant, an online tool that follows best practices in data stewardship and walks you through key questions about your data.


Getting started with systematic reviews

Date: Feb. 18  
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

This session is intended for students, research assistants and faculty who are planning to undertake a systematic review, or who are interested in applying systematic research methods to a current project.  We will discuss the core components of a systematic review, what makes a review ‘systematic’, and how to apply advanced research skills when searching the literature. There will be a particular focus on how best to utilize the library’s resources when undertaking a systematic review.  Participants may wish to look at the Systematic Reviews online guide in advance of the session.


Fair Dealing Week: Copyright and Education –  2021 Update

Date:  Feb. 23
Time: 10 a.m.- 11 a.m.

At this panel presentation, the speakers will review significant legal developments in the areas of fair dealing and copyright, which impact on the educational use of copyright materials.  This includes the Access Copyright v. York University case, decisions by the Copyright Board impacting higher education, and Canadian case law. These developments will be of interest to instructors, faculty, and librarians, and others interested in copyright and education. Participants will also learn about the available supports at the Library to ensure copyright compliance, including the Library’s Digital Course Reading service. This event is a Fair Dealing Week event. 

Speakers:

Julia Shin Doi, general counsel and secretary of the Board of Governors

Carol Shepstone, chief librarian

Ann Ludbrook, copyright and scholarly engagement librarian


Coincidence or Conspiracy: Tackling conspiracy theories with critical research and reading skills

Date: Feb. 23
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

This workshop will go over why conspiracy theories continue to have such an important role in our society and why developing your critical research and reading skills are now more important than ever.


Research poster design

Date: Feb. 23 
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Across all academic disciplines, research posters are an important way of communicating research. We invite you to join New Media Designer Lee Chapman to learn some tips and tricks to make your research poster stand out. This workshop will cover information organization, design principles and strategies for discussing your research with others.

* This is open to the Ryerson community.

** No software required to follow along.


Work smarter, not harder: reading scholarly articles strategically

Date: Feb. 24   
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Did you know that scholarly articles require a different approach to reading than the one you’d use for a novel or a newspaper? This workshop will break down the jargon, teach the different elements of a scholarly article, and explain how to read strategically. Learning to read strategically will save you time on your readings and make you a more effective researcher. 

This class is intended for students in all programs and especially encouraged for incoming graduate students.


Navigating e-resources

Date: Feb. 24
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Learn how to use the Library’s extensive collection of electronic databases to find the best and most relevant and scholarly information available. This is the type of information your professors want you to use in your assignments and essays. The Library’s Search Everything function will also be demonstrated and the differences between information retrieved through Google and the Library’s scholarly sources of information will  be discussed. This workshop will be offered through Zoom.  A link to the session will be sent to you before the workshop.  Please check your email.

January 2021

Working with Facebook’s Spark AR

Date: Jan. 13
Time: 6 p.m. – 7p.m.

Facebook’s Spark AR is a free and easy to use app for creating Augmented Reality experiences. Participants will learn how to build Who Are You? and What Are You? Instagram filters. 

This is the second part of a Library DME Instagram filter workshop offered during the fall term.

To get caught up, take a look at the first presentation!

Spark AR is free to download


Project management basics for graduate research

Date: Jan. 19
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

The new year usually means new projects! Working on small or large-scale projects and have no idea how to start? Work with a fellow graduate student who is also a Project Management Institute-certified Project Management Professional (PMP) to learn some of the basic principles of project management to help you supercharge your productivity and get stuff done.


Navigating the Library’s eResources

Date: Jan. 20
Time: 10 a.m – 11 a.m.

Learn how to use the Library’s extensive collection of electronic databases to find the best and most relevant and scholarly information available. This is the type of information your professors want you to use in your assignments and essays. The Library’s Search Everything function will also be demonstrated and the differences between information retrieved through Google and the Library’s scholarly sources of information will  be discussed. This workshop will be offered through Zoom.  A link to the session will be sent to you before the workshop.  Please check your email.


Getting started with LaTeX: an intro to basic features

Date: Jan. 20
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

LaTeX is a document preparation system widely used in many STEM fields. As an alternative to MS Word or Google Docs, LaTeX specializes in the creation of professional documents, and excels in typesetting equations, inserting figures and graphics, and managing references. If you haven’t used it before there is a learning curve, but once you are familiar with some basic commands you can create professional-looking documents very easily. This workshop will provide a quick overview of core LaTeX features and will get you started with a simple document in Overleaf.  Note: No previous knowledge of LaTeX is required.


Adobe Illustrator

Date: Jan. 20
Time: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Adobe Illustrator is used to create graphics for all types of media. Whether you’re an artist,  entrepreneur, or both, Illustrator can help you visualize and communicate ideas. 

In this workshop, learn the basics of using Illustrator by creating a brand logo.

Here’s a handy Illustrator overview to get you started – Adobe Illustrator for Beginners


Critical data literacy and COVID-19 visualizations: strategies to slow the spread of misinformation

Date: Jan. 21
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

The need to understand data visualizations has never been more important. Every day we are inundated with more Covid-19 data, graphs and charts. Some of these data visualizations are well-designed and easy to understand, and others are confusing and misleading. This workshop will cover common data visualization issues that lead to confusion and misinformation, and will use critical data literacy strategies to evaluate charts and graphs.

Work smarter, not harder: reading scholarly articles strategically

Date: Jan. 26
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Did you know that scholarly articles require a different approach to reading than the one you’d use for a novel or a newspaper? This workshop will break down the jargon, teach the different elements of a scholarly article, and explain how to read strategically. Learning to read strategically will save you time on your readings and make you a more effective researcher. 

This class is intended for students in all programs and especially encouraged for incoming graduate students.


Market research for everyone

Date: Jan. 26
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Do you want to get started on market research for your venture, small business, or organization? This hands-on workshop introduces participants to subscription databases available through Ryerson Library that can help you find relevant data, consumer/client behaviour and preferences, industry trends, and more. This workshop is open to all Ryerson students and employees, and no prior experience is required. Please have your my.ryerson login information available to use during the session.


WordPress basics: build your own creative portfolio

Date: Jan. 27 
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

An online presence for a researcher or creative professional is now more important than ever. Do you have creative projects you want to share with the scholarly community or industry contacts? Learn how to build your own portfolio site in this quick and easy overview. Using WordPress.com themes, you’ll be able to build a starter website for your teaching dossier, creative projects or professional resume.


Demystifying the literature review

Date: Jan. 28
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

From annotated bibliographies to literature reviews to systematic reviews, students are frequently asked to find scholarly articles about a topic and provide thoughtful analysis of what they read. This workshop will provide participants with the information they need to identify what sort of review they are doing, how to find what they need, read the material with a critical eye and keep it all organized.


Market research for everyone

Date: Jan. 28
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Do you want to get started on market research for your venture, small business, or organization? This hands-on workshop introduces participants to subscription databases available through Ryerson Library that can help you find relevant data, consumer/client behaviour and preferences, industry trends, and more. This workshop is open to all Ryerson students and employees, and no prior experience is required. Please have your my.ryerson login information available to use during the session.

December 2020

Build Your Own Creative Portfolio

Date: December 2, 2020
Time: 1 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

The need to understand data visualizations has never been more important. Every day we are inundated with more Covid-19 data, graphs and charts. Some of these data visualizations are well-designed and easy to understand, and others are confusing and misleading. This workshop will cover common data visualization issues that lead to confusion and misinformation, and will use critical data literacy strategies to evaluate charts and graphs.

November 2020

3D Development for the Looking Glass Holographic Display

Date: Nov 4
Time: 11 a.m. – 12: 30 p.m.

This workshop will provide an overview of holographic display technology and how to develop for a looking glass holographic display. This session will be divided into three parts, with part one focusing on the overview of holographic display tech, part two focusing on 3D optimizing techniques using Blender, and development techniques using the Unity Game Engine. This session is targeted towards beginners and will focus on basic principles for 3D modelling as well as basic program UI navigation.

* Participants are not required to download any software for this workshop. Links will be provided to free Blender and Unity software downloads.


Demystifying the Literature Review

Date: Nov 4
Time: 2 – 3 p.m.

From annotated bibliographies to literature reviews to systematic reviews, students are frequently asked to find scholarly articles about a topic and provide thoughtful analysis of what they read. This workshop will provide participants with the information they need to identify what sort of review they are doing, how to find what they need, read the material with a critical eye and keep it all organized.


Work Smarter, Not Harder:  Reading Scholarly Articles Strategically

Date: Nov. 5
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Did you know that scholarly articles require a different approach to reading than the one you’d use for a novel or a newspaper? This workshop will break down the jargon, teach the different elements of a scholarly article, and explain how to read strategically. Learning to read strategically will save you time on your readings and make you a more effective researcher. 

This class is intended for students in all programs and especially encouraged for incoming graduate students. 

Library instructor: Lisa Levesque


How to make an Instagram Filter

Date: Nov. 6
Time: 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

In this is Library DME intro session to Spark AR, students will learn the basics of creating instagram filters and Augmented Reality content.


Prototyping at Home

Date: Nov. 12
Time: 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

This Library DME workshop provides an introduction to prototyping and making your ideas reality while at home.


Create Your Own Holograms for Education

Date: Nov. 17
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Learn how to create holograms with tools you already have around the house, and free software online. Learn how to bring your ideas to life to delight students and conference attendees. Add some fun into your classrooms and conference presentations with holograms. Led by Tanya Pobuda, this quickstart overview to holograms will give you a step-by-step guide to create holograms, with an opportunity to dive deeper in future sessions.

This is open to the Ryerson community.

Archives and the Reach of Indigenous Dispossession

Date: Nov. 17
Time: 2 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

What does it take to repatriate intangible cultural heritage? In this talk, Dr. Robin R. R. Gray will discuss an ongoing case study to repatriate songs with, by and for Ts’msyen from Lax Kw’alaams, BC, to point to the colonizing properties of property in the archive. 

Bio:

Dr. Robin R. R. Gray is Ts’msyen from Lax Kw’alaams, BC and Mikisew Cree from Fort Chipewyan, AB. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Gray’s current community-based research projects focus on the repatriation of Ts’msyen songs, and foundational issues related to the protection, management, ownership, access and control of Indigenous cultural heritage.


Navigating the Library e-resources

Date: Nov 17
Time: 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Learn how to use the Library’s extensive collection of electronic databases to find the best and most relevant and scholarly information available. This is the type of information your professors want you to use in your assignments and essays. The Library’s Search Everything function will also be demonstrated and the differences between information retrieved through Google and the Library’s scholarly sources of information will  be discussed. This workshop will be offered through Zoom.  A link to the session will be sent to you before the workshop.  Please check your email.

Library instructor: Diane Grandfield


How to use Adobe Illustrator

Date: Nov. 18
Time: 4 p.m. – 5 p.m.

In this workshop participants will learn the basics of illustrator, including how to start a file, how to start your first drawing, how to work with colors, how to work with layers, drawing and editing lines.


Selected Topics in WebAR

Date: Nov. 24
Time: 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

In this session, Library Collaboratory Research Assistant, Jae Seo and Library Information Technology Services Researcher, Michael Carter-Arlt will talk about their experiences of using Web-based Augmented Reality (WebAR) for the “Remastered” Exhibition at the Aga Khan Museum. 

WebAR is a new way of viewing AR content without the need for downloading native applications. This session will feature an overview of AR, and cover such topics such as current trends in AR, pros and cons of AR versus WebAR, and future directions of AR in the future. Currently available WebAR platforms will also be analyzed. Recent Master of Digital Media (MDM) graduate Eileen Xue will also join the session to discuss her WebAR graduate research.

* This is open to the Ryerson community.


Getting Started with Systematic Reviews

Date: Nov. 25
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

This session is intended for students, research assistants and faculty who are planning to undertake a systematic review, or who are interested in applying systematic research methods to a current project. Locating the evidence is a key component of the systematic review process, and can require advanced research skills and techniques, as well as extensive use of library resources and services. This session will cover topics such as database selection, keyword searching, and finding grey literature.  Participants may wish to look at the Systematic Reviews guide in advance of the session, which is online at: https://learn.library.ryerson.ca/systematic_reviews

October 2020

The pandemic isn’t fake news: fighting harmful narratives with credible sources 

Date: Oct. 1
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

How do we know if the information we encounter is trustworthy? This is a tricky question at the best of times, let alone during a global pandemic that generates fear and rapidly changing facts. This workshop will cover fake news issues that have arisen during COVID-19 and offer practical strategies for identifying dubious online information and replacing it with authoritative sources. In doing so it will ask participants to consider the harmful narratives underlying fake news and how to take action against them. 

Library instructor: Lisa Levesque


Grant Writing for Graduate Students

Date: Oct 5 and Oct 6
Time: 1 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

An introduction to grant writing for academic proposals, arts-based poposals and journalist project proposals.

Led by Nathaniel Brunt, this small and interactive practical workshop will involve informal lecture by the instructor and short presentations by participants, over the course of two sessions.

Session 1 (Oct 5): A general overview on “how to”: creating a pitch, strategies, technique, writing with clarity, purpose and understanding audience

Session 2 (optional, Oct 6): An interactive session in which students come prepared to present their project proposals to the group for critique. Building on Session 1, students will workshop their proposals to each other, and through discussion, share insights about each other’s work, identify vulnerabilities in the work, and ultimately strengthen their proposals for grant submission.

Please note: Session 2 is optional. To attend Session 2, registrants must have attended Session 1.

Contact collab@ryerson.ca to register.


Navigating the Library e-resources

Date: Oct 7
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Learn how to use the Library’s extensive collection of electronic databases to find the best and most relevant and scholarly information available. This is the type of information your professors want you to use in your assignments and essays. The Library’s Search Everything function will also be demonstrated and the differences between information retrieved through Google and the Library’s scholarly sources of information will  be discussed. This workshop will be offered through Zoom.  A link to the session will be sent to you before the workshop.  Please check your email.

Library instructor: Alison Skyrme


Work Smarter, Not Harder:  Reading Scholarly Articles Strategically

Date: Oct 8
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Did you know that scholarly articles require a different approach to reading than the one you’d use for a novel or a newspaper? This workshop will break down the jargon, teach the different elements of a scholarly article, and explain how to read strategically. Learning to read strategically will save you time on your readings and make you a more effective researcher. 

This class is intended for students in all programs and especially encouraged for incoming graduate students. 

Library instructor: Lisa Levesque


Intervening Into Facial Recognition (Talk/Presentation)

Date: Oct. 9 
Time: 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

This talk will discuss the collaborative work of Library Collaboratory Research Assistant Jae Seo, and Library Collaboratory member Aaron Tucker, which centres on making facial recognition technologies more transparent and understandable while also providing toolkits to intervene in the technology.

* This talk is open to the Ryerson community.


Navigating the Library e-resources

Date: Oct 21

Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Learn how to use the Library’s extensive collection of electronic databases to find the best and most relevant and scholarly information available. This is the type of information your professors want you to use in your assignments and essays. The Library’s Search Everything function will also be demonstrated and the differences between information retrieved through Google and the Library’s scholarly sources of information will  be discussed. This workshop will be offered through Zoom.  A link to the session will be sent to you before the workshop.  Please check your email

Library instructor: Diane Granfield


Introduction to 3D Design for Prototyping

Date: Oct 22  
Time: 1 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Instructed by Library Collaboratory Research Technology Officer Jimmy Tran, this short workshop will introduce neophytes to 3D design software. Participants will learn the basics of 3D design for 3D printing for prototyping purposes. This workshop will introduce the concept of designing something to be made with 3D printing and other methods of fabrication.

* This session is open to the Ryerson community. Beginners are welcome, no experience necessary. Space is limited.

** Participants will require Fusion 360 to follow along


Demystifying the Literature Review

Date: Oct 23
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Need to tackle a literature review? Learn more about the process!

From annotated bibliographies to literature reviews to systematic reviews, students are frequently asked to find scholarly articles about a topic and provide thoughtful analysis of what they read. Instructed by Librarian Jane Schmidt, this workshop will provide participants with the information they need to identify what sort of review they are doing, how to find what they need, read the material with a critical eye and keep it all organized.

* Students from all departments are welcome to register.

Capture Your World: Method 3D Scanning (Talk/Presentation)

Date: Oct 28

Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Library Collaboratory Research Technology Officer Jimmy Tran presents a survey of various methods of scanning real world environment and objects to create digital 3D models. This is an introduction to the technologies that are either currently available or being developed at the Collaboratory. Examples of these technologies include: photogrammetry, stereo camera, Arctic Spider, structured light camera, and LiDAR.

* This is open to the Ryerson community.


September 2020

Pitching through storytelling

Date: Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

This interactive workshop highlights tools for building and telling your pitch as a story. Storytelling helps speakers engage and connect with an audience, as well organize the information and research. This workshop will help you consider what type of story you would like to tell, how to tweak your story for different audiences, and how to find and fill gaps in your story using tools from the Library.

This workshop is designed for students who have an interest in presenting their businesses, inventions, creative ideas, ventures, or other products or activities to a group: potential investors, contributors, collaborators, or others.

Instructor: Reece Steinberg

* All members of the Ryerson community are welcome.

** Please have your my.ryerson login info available so you can access the Library collection during this workshop.


3 great reasons to use the Ryerson Library

Date:  September 16 

Time: 11 a.m. – 12  p.m.

Welcome to the Ryerson Library!  We know that this year will be a different university experience than what you were expecting, but we want you to know that Ryerson Librarians are here for you and we will do all we can to help make your academic experience a successful one. In this workshop we will provide you with three great reasons to use the Ryerson Library through its virtual services. We will also show you the Library’s extensive collection of online resources, tools you can use for your course assignments and provide tips on how to use them effectively. Come meet some of your librarians and learn about all the ways we can all help you throughout the coming year.


Hints and Tips for Passing the Canadian Basic/Advance Operation Drone Pilot Exams

Date: September 22, 2020
Time: 11 a.m – Noon

This workshop is designed to help interested researchers with assistance for preparing for the Basic or Advance Operation Drone Pilot Exam. This is not a course, but rather a guide on where to obtain some of the materials for the exam, with strategies and how to prepare.

Library Instructor: Jimmy Tran

This session is open to the Ryerson Community


Pitching through storytelling

Date: Wednesday, Sept. 23
Time: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m

This  interactive workshop highlights tools for building and telling your pitch as a story. Storytelling helps speakers engage and connect with an audience, as well as organize the information and research. This workshop will help you consider what type of story you would like to tell, how to tweak your story for different audiences, and how to find and fill gaps in your story using tools from the Library.

Designed for students who have an interest in presenting their businesses, inventions, creative ideas, ventures, or other products or activities to a group: potential investors, contributors, collaborators, or others.

Library instructor: Reece Steinberg

* All members of the Ryerson community are welcome.

** Please have your my.ryerson login info available so you can access the Library collection during this workshop.Register


Navigating the Library’s e-Resources

Date: September 24

Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Learn how to use the Library’s extensive collection of electronic databases to find the best and most relevant and scholarly information available. This is the type of information your professors want you to use in your assignments and essays. The Library’s Search Everything function will also be demonstrated and the differences between information retrieved through Google and the Library’s scholarly sources of information will  be discussed. This workshop will be offered through Zoom.  A link to the session will be sent to you before the workshop.  Please check your email.Register


3 great reasons to use the Ryerson Library

Date:  September 23

Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Welcome to the Ryerson Library!  We know that this year will be a different university experience than what you were expecting, but we want you to know that Ryerson Librarians are here for you and we will do all we can to help make your academic experience a successful one. In this workshop we will provide you with three great reasons to use the Ryerson Library through its virtual services. We will also show you the Library’s extensive collection of online resources, tools you can use for your course assignments and provide tips on how to use them effectively. Come meet some of your librarians and learn about all the ways we can all help you throughout the coming year.Register


Project management for graduate student research design 

Date: September 30, 2020 
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Working on small or large-scale projects, and have no idea how to start? Work with Tanya Pobuda, a fellow graduate student who is also a Project Management Institute-certified Project Management Professional (PMP), to learn some of the basic principles of project management to help you supercharge your productivity and get stuff done.

Instructor: Tanya Pobuda

This session is open to the Ryerson community, but primarily intended for graduate students. Space is limited.Register

August 2020

Introduction to 3D Printing for 3D Prototyping

Date:  August 12
Time:  11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

This workshop introduces participants to 3D design basics for the purposes of 3D prototype printing. This workshop will introduce the concept of designing something to be made with 3D printing or some other method of fabrication.

* This session is open to the Ryerson community. Beginners are welcome, no experience necessary.

** Participants will require Fusion 360 and/or SolidWorks to follow along.

Library instructor: Jimmy Tran


Build your own Creative Portfolio

Date:  August 18
Time:  3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Have creative projects you want to share with the scholarly community and industry contacts? This workshop will lead you through learning how to build your own portfolio site in this quick and easy overview. Using WordPress themes, you’ll be able to build a starter website for your teaching dossier, creative projects or professional resume, for free.

Instructor: Tanya Pobuda and Cristina Pietropaolo


The pandemic isn’t fake news: fighting harmful narratives with credible sources

Date:  August 19 
Time: 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.  

How do we know if the information we encounter is trustworthy? This is a tricky question at the best of times, let alone during a global pandemic that generates fear and rapidly changing facts. This workshop will cover fake news issues that have arisen during COVID-19 and offer practical strategies for identifying dubious online information and replacing it with authoritative sources. In doing so it will ask participants to consider the harmful narratives underlying fake news and how to take action against them. 

Library instructor: Lisa Levesque


3 great reasons to use the Ryerson Library

Date:  August 19 
Time: 11 a.m. – 12  p.m

Welcome to the Ryerson Library!  We know that this year will be a different university experience than what you were expecting, but we want you to know that Ryerson Librarians are here for you and we will do all we can to help make your academic experience a successful one. In this workshop we will provide you with three great reasons to use the Ryerson Library through its virtual services. We will also show you the Library’s extensive collection of online resources, tools you can use for your course assignments and provide tips on how to use them effectively. Come meet some of your librarians and learn about all the ways we can all help you throughout the coming year.  

Library instructors:  Reece Steinberg and Don Kinder


3 great reasons to use the Ryerson Library

Date:  August 24 
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Welcome to the Ryerson Library!  We know that this year will be a different university experience than what you were expecting, but we want you to know that Ryerson Librarians are here for you and we will do all we can to help make your academic experience a successful one. In this workshop we will provide you with three great reasons to use the Ryerson Library through its virtual services. We will also show you the Library’s extensive collection of online resources, tools you can use for your course assignments and provide tips on how to use them effectively. Come meet some of your librarians and learn about all the ways we can all help you throughout the coming year.  

Library instructors:  Reece Steinberg and Don Kinder


The pandemic isn’t fake news: fighting harmful narratives with credible sources

Date: August 26
Time: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.

How do we know if the information we encounter is trustworthy? This is a tricky question at the best of times, let alone during a global pandemic that generates fear and rapidly changing facts. This workshop will cover fake news issues that have arisen during COVID-19 and offer practical strategies for identifying dubious online information and replacing it with authoritative sources. In doing so it will ask participants to consider the harmful narratives underlying fake news and how to take action against them. 

Library instructor: Lisa Levesque


Virtual Board Gaming: Paperback Edition!

Date: August 27
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Play Paperback with friends old and new this month on Tabletopia. 

This month’s game is Paperback, to be played on the board game platform Tabletopia. Play games with friends no matter where they are in the world.

If you’ve never played before, you’ll be walked through the process! If you like, you can familiarize yourself with game beforehand, here.

* Beginners welcome, no experience necessary. Space is limited.** This session is open to the Ryerson community. Sign up for a free Tabletopia account to participate in this session.

Library instructor: Tanya Pobuda

July 2020

The pandemic isn’t fake news: fighting harmful narratives with credible sources

Date: July 8
Time: 4 p.m. – 5 p.m.

How do we know if the information we encounter is trustworthy? This is a tricky question at the best of times, let alone during a global pandemic that generates fear and rapidly changing facts. This workshop will cover fake news issues that have arisen during COVID-19 and offer practical strategies for identifying dubious online information and replacing it with authoritative sources. In doing so it will ask participants to consider the harmful narratives underlying fake news and how to take action against them.

Library instructor: Lisa Levesque


Drones for Research: Canadian Laws & Regulations

Date: July 16
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

A short workshop on Canadian Laws and Regulations for flying Remotely Piloted Aircrafts (RPAs)/drones and how to be certified. Participants will go through Canadian laws and regulations to learn how to legally and safely use drones for their research. Some applications of drones in research projects will also be presented.

Library instructors: Dan Jakubek and Jimmy Tran


Art in Motion: Basic Animation Techniques for Creating 2D & 3D Cinematics

Date: July 21
Time: 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This workshop will focus on using Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, AfterEffects and PremierePro to create 2D cinemagraphs of paintings and 3D cinemagraphs of still photography. Participants will be guided through the process of transforming paintings into basic animations, as well as show how video can be edited with still photography to create animated gifs used in animated photography. The goal of the workshop is for participants to be able to enhance their already existing content, and to provide them with alternative methods of creating  augmented content.

* This session is open to the Ryerson community. Beginners welcome, no experience necessary.

** Participants will require Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, AfterEffects and PremierePro to follow along with the facilitator, and may require some basic familiarity with the software. Software is not available through Ryerson, but must be purchased separately.

Facilitated by Library Collaboratory member: Michael Carter-Arlt

Identifying weight discrimination in research

Date: July 23
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Weight and size bias and discrimination in research can be present in a wide variety of subjects, from health fields to social sciences, business, and beyond. Interested in discussing methods to avoid this type of bias? This interactive online workshop focuses on evaluating resources for implicit and explicit weight and size bias, and how study design, keywords and search strategies can bias results. 

Instructor:  Reece Steinberg


Creating an Artificial Intelligence (AI) Chatbot

Date: July 23
Time: 2 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

This quick start session will show you the basics of creating a chatbot from the Amazon Web Services (AWS) portfolio of tools, including Amazon Lex. Learn the basics and discuss the psychological and sociological implications of UX copywriting in this provocative quick-start training session.

* This open to the Ryerson community. Beginners welcome, no experience necessary. Space is limited

Library instructor: Tanya Pobuda


Virtual Board Gaming on Tabletopia: Dice Thrones

Date: July 30
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

This month join us for Dice Throne played on the board game platform Tabletopia. Play games with friends no matter where they are in the world.

If you’ve never played before, you’ll be walked through the process! If you like, you can familiarize yourself with game beforehand, here.

* Beginners welcome, no experience necessary. Space is limited.

Library instructor: Tanya Pobuda

June 2020

Introduction to Adobe Lightroom for Post-Production

Date: June 11, 2020 
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

An introductory session exploring important functions and applications of Adobe Lightroom, particularly for photographic post-production. Attendees will gain a basic understanding of the software’s interface, modules, and tools for use in photographic post-production and archive management. Workshop followed by a short Q&A.

* This session is open to the Ryerson community. Participants will need Adobe Lightroom to participate. Beginners are welcome, no experience is necessary. Space is limited.

Library Collaboratory member: Nathaniel Brunt


The Pandemic isn’t Fake News: Fighting Harmful Narratives with Credible Sources

Date: June 18, 2020
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

How do we know if the information we encounter is trustworthy? This is a tricky question at the best of times, let alone during a global pandemic that generates fear and rapidly changing facts. This workshop will cover fake news issues that have arisen during COVID-19 and offer practical strategies for identifying dubious online information and replacing it with authoritative sources. In doing so it will ask participants to consider the harmful narratives underlying fake news and how to take action against them.

Library instructor: Lisa Levesque


Writing the Story of Your Research for Audio 

Date: June 18
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Ever thought about the different ways you could present your graduate research? Seeking a creative outlet, but don’t want to get derailed? Podcasts and radio features require a different kind of narrative that can even lead you to reexamine your research or understand it from another perspective. In this virtual workshop, participants will learn about telling the engaging story of research and writing for audio, and adapting from their academic writing. 

* This is open to the Ryerson community. Beginners welcome, no experience necessary. Space is limited

Library instructor: Cristina Pietropaolo

The Pandemic isn’t Fake News: Fighting Harmful Narratives with Credible Sources

Date: June 23, 2020
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

How do we know if the information we encounter is trustworthy? This is a tricky question at the best of times, let alone during a global pandemic that generates fear and rapidly changing facts. This workshop will cover fake news issues that have arisen during COVID-19 and offer practical strategies for identifying dubious online information and replacing it with authoritative sources. In doing so it will ask participants to consider the harmful narratives underlying fake news and how to take action against them.

Library instructor: Lisa Levesque


Demystifying the Literature Review

Date:  June 24, 2020
Time:  2 p.m. – 3 p.m. 

From annotated bibliographies to literature reviews to systematic reviews, students are frequently asked to find scholarly articles about a topic and provide thoughtful analysis of what they read. This workshop will provide participants with the information they need to identify what sort of review they are doing, how to find what they need, read the material with a critical eye and keep it all organized. 

 Library instructor:  Jane Schmidt


Virtual Board Gaming on Tabletopia

Date: June 26, 2020
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Did you know that playing games has been correlated to a reduction in cognitive fatigue? Join us for virtual board gaming over Tabletopia. Learn to play some of the world’s most popular board games and discuss the core mechanics of board games and game design.

* This open to the Ryerson community. Beginners welcome, no experience necessary. Space is limited.


Getting Started with Systematic Reviews

Date:  June 29, 2020
Time:  2 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. 

This session is intended for students, research assistants and faculty who are planning to undertake a systematic review, or who are interested in applying systematic research methods to a current project.  We will discuss the core components of a systematic review, what makes a review ‘systematic’, and how to apply advanced research skills when searching the literature. There will be a particular focus on how best to utilize the library’s resources when undertaking a systematic review.  Participants may wish to look at the Systematic Reviews guide in advance of the session.

Library instructor:  Cecile Farnum