Library Online Workshops: June 2021

Demystifying the literature review

Date: Wednesday, June 2
Time: 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

From annotated bibliographies to literature and systematic reviews, this workshop provides participants with the information needed to identify different types of reviews, how to find what’s needed, read the material with a critical eye, and keep it all organized.


Legal research for social sciences and humanities

Date: Wednesday, June 9
Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Researching the history of crime? Writing media coverage for a trial? This workshop covers the basics of legal research for researchers in the humanities and social sciences, including: different sources of law,  key terminology, and major resources for legal research.


Getting started with systematic reviews

Date: Thursday, June 10
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

This session is intended for students, research assistants and faculty who are planning to undertake a systematic review, or who are interested in applying systematic research methods to a current project. We will discuss the core components of a systematic review, what makes a review ‘systematic’, and how to apply advanced research skills when searching the literature. There will be a particular focus on how best to utilize the library’s resources when undertaking a systematic review. Participants may wish to look at the Systematic Reviews online guide in advance of the session.

Introduction to Zotero

Date: Tuesday, June 22
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Zotero is a free, easy-to-use tool that helps you collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources. Zotero let’s you add citations to journal articles, websites and books with a single click. You can also use it to create footnotes, endnotes, in-text citations, or bibliographies in the style of your choice. Use of a citation manager is highly recommended for graduate students, faculty, and research assistants.


Marketing for everyone

Date: Tuesday, June 22
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Getting started on market research for a new venture, small business, or organization? This workshop introduces participants to subscription databases that can help you find relevant data, consumer/client behaviour and preferences, industry trends, and more.


Perfecting the project pitch 

Date: Wednesday, June 16
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

This workshop provides practical guidance, tips, and personalized feedback on pitching for academic and non-academic projects. Following a presentation by the instructor, participants will go into breakout groups and develop their own pitch presentations.


A beginner’s guide to textual analysis 

Date: Monday, June 28
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Textual analysis investigates how language, pictures and symbols can provide insight on how something or someone is communicating. Learn the basics about what text analysis can tell you about a person or organization, and some free tools to help you do it.


Library Online Workshops: May 2021

Demystifying the Literature Review

Date: May 11
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

From annotated bibliographies to literature and systematic reviews, students are frequently asked to find scholarly articles about a topic and provide thoughtful analysis of what they read. This workshop will provide participants with the information they need to identify what sort of review they are doing, how to find what they need, read the material with a critical eye and keep it all organized.


Grow-a-Game: Values at Play

Date: May 19
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Want to uncover the hidden messages in some of the world’s favourite games? Interested in learning some basics of game design?

Join us for this unique event focused on engaging critical discussion about game design. Participants (individually or in groups) will also learn to grow-a-game, that reflects their values and narrative.

Participants will come away from the event with a deeper understanding about game design, a game of their own design, and a toolkit of resources.

Open to all students at Ryerson University, though especially intended for students in the arts, humanities and social services.

No experience is required.
No materials or software are required.

Getting started with systematic reviews

Date: May 20
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

This session is intended for students, research assistants and faculty who are planning to undertake a systematic review, or who are interested in applying systematic research methods to a current project. We will discuss the core components of a systematic review, what makes a review ‘systematic’, and how to apply advanced research skills when searching the literature. There will be a particular focus on how best to utilize the library’s resources when undertaking a systematic review. Participants may wish to look at the Systematic Reviews online guide in advance of the session.


Demystifying the literature review

Date: May 27
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

From annotated bibliographies to literature and systematic reviews, students are frequently asked to find scholarly articles about a topic and provide thoughtful analysis of what they read. This workshop will provide participants with the information they need to identify what sort of review they are doing, how to find what they need, read the material with a critical eye and keep it all organized.


Library Online Workshops: April 2021

The Real World Laboratory of Algorithmic Policing and Migration Control

Date: April 6
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Please join the Library for a discussion with Petra Molnar and Kate Robertson, Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto, on how algorithmic control is instituted and maintained in law enforcement and migration environments. 

Molnar, author of Technological Testing Grounds and co-author of Bots at the Gate, will discuss the ways in which refugees and immigrants are used to test automated decision-making systems. 

Robertson, co-author of To Surveil and Predict, will explain the ways in which predictive policing practices are utilized in Canada, and the larger implications of the broad use of such technologies. 

Talks will be followed by a Q & A.


Coincidence or Conspiracy: Tackling conspiracy theories with critical research and reading skills

Date: April 8
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

This workshop explores the reasons why conspiracy theories continue to have such an important role in our society and why developing your critical research and reading skills are now more important than ever. We will discuss the history of conspiracy theories, why we believe them, and how to fight them.


How to Make an App with “No-Code”

Library DME student led digital skills workshop

Date: April 9
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Developing apps usually has a steep learning curve. But programs such as Glide provide an alternative by allowing for easy ‘drag and drop’ visual app development. This 1 hour student-led workshop will teach participants how to make interactive apps using Glide powered by Google sheets with no additional coding. Using these skills participants will be able to deploy their own data driven apps easily and quickly.


Getting started with LaTeX: an intro to basic features

Date: April 13
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

LaTeX is a document preparation system widely used in many STEM fields. As an alternative to MS Word or Google Docs, LaTeX specializes in the creation of professional documents, and excels in typesetting equations, inserting figures and graphics, and managing references. If you haven’t used it before there is a learning curve, but once you are familiar with some basic commands you can create professional-looking documents very easily. This workshop will provide a quick overview of core LaTeX features and will get you started with a simple document in Overleaf. Note: No previous knowledge of LaTeX is required. 

This workshop is taught by Nora Mulvaney, research data management and engineering librarian.


Editing Your Photos Using Adobe Photoshop

Library DME student led digital skills workshop

Date: April 14
Time: 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Photoshop is industry standard software for photo editing. In this student-led workshop we’ll show you the basics of photo editing using Adobe PS. Participants will learn standard techniques and tools such as adjusting brightness and contrast, image levels, how to use adjustment curves and more. Participants will leave with all the tools needed to make great images. Having a working copy of Photoshop is recommended to not required. Participants are welcome to contact us with specific use cases and questions here: dme@ryerson.ca

Writing a Data Management Plan using DMP Assistant 

Date: April 15
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

A data management plan (DMP) is a document that outlines what data will be created, and what you will do with that data during and after your research project. Documenting a plan for your data is good practice and an integral part of responsible data management. This workshop will go through the steps of creating a data management plan using DMP Assistant, an online tool that follows best practices in data stewardship and walks you through key questions about your data. 

This workshop is taught by Nora Mulvaney, research data management and engineering librarian.


How to Use Tableau for Data Visualization

Library DME student led digital skills workshop

Date: April 15
Time: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Tableau is becoming an industry standard tool for data visualization and data analysis due to its capabilities and ease of use. This student-led workshop will show participants the basics of using Tableau from connecting to a dataset, to filtering and interpreting data. Participants will learn the worksheet basics, creating different visuals, including axis formatting and labelling etc. Lastly participants will be given an introduction to interactive dashboards for pattern observation, and using visuals to create data stories.


Navigating the Library’s e-resources

Date: April 20
Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Learn how to use the Library’s extensive collection of electronic databases to find the best and most relevant and scholarly information available. This is the type of information your professors want you to use in your assignments and essays. The Library’s Search Everything function will also be demonstrated and the differences between information retrieved through Google and the Library’s scholarly sources of information will  be discussed. This workshop will be offered through Zoom.  A link to the session will be sent to you before the workshop.  Please check your email.


How to Start Programming with Python

Library DME student led digital skills workshop

Date: April 20
Time: 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Python is a programming language built for simplicity and diverse applications. Use cases range from simple programs to web building to software and app development. It’s a great beginner language if you’re new to programming and coding!

This student-led workshop will take you through the very basics of Python, including variables, syntax, printing, and basic loops. Participants are welcome to contact us with specific use cases and questions here: dme@ryerson.ca This session is open to everyone and meant for first-time coders, or those looking for a refresher.


How to broadcast/stream content online using Twitch and OBS

Library DME student led digital skills workshop

Date: April 22
Time: 4 p.m. – 5 p.m.

In this skill building session you’ll learn how to use OBS and Twitch to create professional and engaging live streams. Livestreaming allows content creators to broadcast online in real-time, as well as directly converse with an audience. This allows a more organic user experience. In this context Twitch has been used for instruction, streaming games and connecting with communities. This student-led workshop will cover the basics of working with Twitch streaming, best practices, and things to consider. Participants are welcome to contact us with specific use cases and questions here: dme@ryerson.ca


Past Online Workshops