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Tag: scholarly communication

Research Profile Development Workshop for Graduate Students, March 12th

Do you want to enhance your online research profile? Are you planning to apply for a research grant or a job, or want to be ready when you do?

Then Register for the Research Profile Development Workshop for Graduate Students March 12th, 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. in SLC 508.

Research profile development is an important part of modern scholarship, for applying to jobs and grants as well as submitting papers for publication. Online profiles can aid in mobilizing your research and accomplishments so others can easily find them.

  • Guest speaker Philip Mai from the Social Media Lab will discuss the importance of online research profiles.
  • Learn how to populate both your research ID using ORCID and an online research profile using Google Scholar in a hands-on workshop with Ryerson University librarians (bring your laptop).

This lunch and learn session, specifically for graduate students, is brought to you by the Ryerson University Library in partnership with the Yeates School of Graduate Studies.

Ryerson graduate students from all disciplines are invited to attend. This series qualifies for Future Smart, so bring your passport to be signed.

A light lunch will be served. Space is limited, so register early! Please bring your laptop and be prepared to work on your profile.

Please contact l2mutic@ryerson.ca if you require any accessibility or dietary accommodations to ensure your inclusion in this event.

Fair Dealing Week: Copyright Review 2018

Happy Fair Dealing Week!
Why are we celebrating this week – especially in Canada?
Fair dealing defines important users rights allowed by Canadian laws. These user rights give Canadian citizens the ability to use fair dealing as an exception to the exclusive rights of copyright holders to control the copying and distributing of their content. Without fair dealing, this exclusive right could mean that, other than an insubstantial amount of a work, the work could never be copied without the permission of the copyright holder. User’s rights in the form of fair dealing mean that some copying is allowed without permission – for certain socially valuable purposes and for short amounts of a work.
Have a look at Student Life without Fair Dealing to get an idea about how important fair dealing can be in an educational environment. Without fair dealing you would not be able to do many of the things you do everyday as a student – use an image in an assignment that you are handing in, share an article with your group project team, photocopy a chapter you need from a library book so you can read it at home.
Luckily for students and educators some of the copying of works that we do in our learning and teaching are covered by fair dealing. For example fair dealing purposes include private study, research, criticism, review and education and parody and satire. Much of what students and educators do on a daily basis would be really really hard without this user’s right. Student and faculty ability to do effective research, use content in criticism and papers, teach and share information would be seriously inhibited. Fair dealing is really important because it allows a freer flow of information to happen in an educational setting – it promotes learning and scholarship. So celebrate Fair Dealing – it is a user’s right that Canadians should use, not lose.
This year celebrating fair dealing  is especially important, because it is 5 years since the scope of fair dealing in Canada was expanded to include education.  After 5 years the government calls for a review of the new Copyright Act, which will happen this year. The website Fair Dealing Canada gives you an opportunity to tell your story of how fair dealing helps you educate others or be educated. Add your story there and help convince the government that this user’s right is very important to your education.

Fair Dealing Week 2018 Event on February 26th

The week of February 26th is Fair Use/ Fair Dealing Week – an annual event to highlight, celebrate and educate about fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions.  As part of our celebration of Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week, the Library is hosting a panel discussion, Copyright and Education: 2018 Update

At this panel presentation, the speakers will review significant legal developments in the areas of fair dealing and copyright, which impact on the educational ​use of copyright materials.  This includes the recent ruling in the Access Copyright v. York University case, as well as the federal government’s current ​ review of the Copyright Act.  These developments will be of interest to instructors, faculty, and librarians​​, and others l​ooking ​to ensure legal compliance with copyrighted materials in the classroom.  Participants will also learn about the available supports at the Library to ensure copyright compliance, including the Library’s One Stop Course Reading Service, Open Educational Resources and Creative Commons licensing.

Date: Monday Feb. 26th, 2018

Location: SLC508

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Speakers:

Julia Shin Doi, General Counsel General Counsel and Secretary of the Board of Governors

Carol Shepstone, Chief Librarian

Ann Ludbrook, Copyright and Scholarly Engagement Librarian