Fair Dealing Week: Copyright Review 2018

Happy Fair Dealing Week!
Why are we celebrating this week – especially in Canada?
Fair dealing defines important users rights allowed by Canadian laws. These user rights give Canadian citizens the ability to use fair dealing as an exception to the exclusive rights of copyright holders to control the copying and distributing of their content. Without fair dealing, this exclusive right could mean that, other than an insubstantial amount of a work, the work could never be copied without the permission of the copyright holder. User’s rights in the form of fair dealing mean that some copying is allowed without permission – for certain socially valuable purposes and for short amounts of a work.
Have a look at Student Life without Fair Dealing to get an idea about how important fair dealing can be in an educational environment. Without fair dealing you would not be able to do many of the things you do everyday as a student – use an image in an assignment that you are handing in, share an article with your group project team, photocopy a chapter you need from a library book so you can read it at home.
Luckily for students and educators some of the copying of works that we do in our learning and teaching are covered by fair dealing. For example fair dealing purposes include private study, research, criticism, review and education and parody and satire. Much of what students and educators do on a daily basis would be really really hard without this user’s right. Student and faculty ability to do effective research, use content in criticism and papers, teach and share information would be seriously inhibited. Fair dealing is really important because it allows a freer flow of information to happen in an educational setting – it promotes learning and scholarship. So celebrate Fair Dealing – it is a user’s right that Canadians should use, not lose.
This year celebrating fair dealing  is especially important, because it is 5 years since the scope of fair dealing in Canada was expanded to include education.  After 5 years the government calls for a review of the new Copyright Act, which will happen this year. The website Fair Dealing Canada gives you an opportunity to tell your story of how fair dealing helps you educate others or be educated. Add your story there and help convince the government that this user’s right is very important to your education.

Fair Dealing Week 2018 Event on February 26th

The week of February 26th is Fair Use/ Fair Dealing Week – an annual event to highlight, celebrate and educate about fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions.  As part of our celebration of Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week, the Library is hosting a panel discussion, Copyright and Education: 2018 Update

At this panel presentation, the speakers will review significant legal developments in the areas of fair dealing and copyright, which impact on the educational ​use of copyright materials.  This includes the recent ruling in the Access Copyright v. York University case, as well as the federal government’s current ​ review of the Copyright Act.  These developments will be of interest to instructors, faculty, and librarians​​, and others l​ooking ​to ensure legal compliance with copyrighted materials in the classroom.  Participants will also learn about the available supports at the Library to ensure copyright compliance, including the Library’s One Stop Course Reading Service, Open Educational Resources and Creative Commons licensing.

Date: Monday Feb. 26th, 2018

Location: SLC508

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Speakers:

Julia Shin Doi, General Counsel General Counsel and Secretary of the Board of Governors

Carol Shepstone, Chief Librarian

Ann Ludbrook, Copyright and Scholarly Engagement Librarian

 

April 26th is World Intellectual Property Day

April 26th is World Intellectual Property Day and is celebrated around the world. Launched by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in 2000 the day was created to raise awareness about how intellectual property like patents, trademarks and copyright are both used and in turn foster creativity.  This year’s theme is Digital Creativity: Culture Reimagined.

Universities are both creators of intellectual property through faculty, instructor, researcher and student output, but are also consumers of intellectual property. Ryerson University Library and Archives spends millions of dollars per year on book and digital journal subscription purchasing. Most of these on-line journal articles are not publicly available to those outside of a university environment without a fee. At universities we are digitally privileged because we pay a substantial amount yearly for access to this content.

The purchases universities make support publishers and at the same time give instructors, researchers and students timely access to the latest scholarly information that can be used in their courses and for their research. Ryerson researchers are also part of the creative cycle as they create and publish new works citing the work that has gone before them.

More about:
World Intellectual Property Day
WIPO

 

Hosting Movie Nights on Campus

Are you interested in showing movies on campus from film studios such as MGM, Universal Studios, Walt Disney, Tristar or Touchstones Pictures?  Did you know that you need public performance rights (PPR) to show  to a group unless it is for teaching purposes? Now for a short period, until Oct 31st, 2013, you can show any films from these studios, and hundreds more, without having to worry about copyright fees. The Library has paid for a leisure licence with Audio-Cine Films Inc. (ACF) that covers PPR outside the classroom.

ACF is a Canadian exclusive rights representative for many of the world’s renowned film studios and producers. The ACF licence provides access to over 1,000 movie titles.  All you need to do is to check whether a film you want to show is in the ACF database.  Then make sure  you are using  legal copies of DVDs for showing. That would include library copies, personal home copies, and rented copies, but no bootlegged materials.

Please contact Ann Ludbrook, Copyright Co-ordinator and Librarian (aludbrook@ryerson.ca or ext. 6910)  for any copyright issues related to hosting movie nights for your student group. You can also contact Ophelia Cheung, Audio Visual Services Librarian (ocheung@ryerson.ca or ext. 5097), if you need assistance with searching the ACF database or acquiring copies not available in the Library collection.