2018/19 Ryerson University Library and Archives OER Grants

 

 

 

The Ryerson University Library and Archives (RULA) is pleased to announce its 2018/19 RULA Open Educational Resources (OER) Grants to encourage the creation and adoption of open educational resources. OER are learning materials that are openly licensed such that they are freely available to be adapted, copied, and shared. OER can be: courses, modules, textbooks, multimedia, assessments, and supplementary materials.

These grants advance the University’s priorities to foster an innovation ecosystem and ensure excellence in student learning experiences, and build on RULA’s digital initiatives, expertise in Open Access and Open Education Resource publishing and dissemination, and academic priorities of access and openness. The Library and Archives is very pleased to collaborate with the Office of eLearning and the Learning and Teaching Office in the review and adjudication of the grants, and in the support of successful projects. A total of $35,000 is available in two categories of grants:

Category 1 – Creation or Adaptation

  • 3 grants for creation or adaptation of an OER textbook or ancillary materials and its subsequent use in class- $10,000 each.

Category 2 – Review and Adoption

  • 5 grants for peer review and adoption of OER, or creation of small-scale supplementary/ ancillary material for an existing OER – $1,000 each.

Objectives of the Grant Program

  • To support faculty members in the review, revision and adoption of open textbooks and other OER materials
  • To increase the use of open educational content, textbooks and OER at Ryerson University resulting in pedagogical innovation, enhanced access for students, and reduced textbook and class material costs.

Eligibility

All RFA and CUPE Faculty members, Librarians and Post-Doctoral fellows, may apply for these grants.

Evaluation Criteria

Proposals will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

  • Curation and customization of OER that will be freely and openly shared within Ryerson University and beyond
  • Impact on student experience, including high-quality materials, maximum access, open and innovative pedagogy, and cost savings to students
  • Active engagement of students with Faculty in the adaptation/adoption of OER
  • Improve discipline/subject OER coverage
  • Complete and viable budget and project outcomes, consistent with project objectives and appropriate administrative approval from your Chair or supervisor as necessary
  • Foster commitment to building equity, community and inclusion, advance the TRC Calls to Action, and alignment with Ryerson’s Academic Plan and priorities

 Guidelines for Applicants

  • Complete the Application Form by 4:00 pm on September 28, 2018. Proposals must be submitted via this link prior to the deadline.
  • Selection Process: Proposals will be evaluated according to an established assessment rubric based on the criteria noted above. A RULA OER Grant Review Committee comprising representation from the Library and Archives (chair), the eLearning Office, and the Learning and Teaching Office will consider all applications. The results of this process will be communicated to each applicant by October 22nd, 2018, and announced during Open Access Week 2018.
  • Funds will be available once a detailed budget is approved by the RULA OER Grant Review Committee.
    • Funds may be used to be used to pay students; editors; graphic designers; videographers, with preference given to projects that employ Ryerson students. Funds cannot be used to purchase equipment or used for travel costs.
    • This is not an equipment fund, however, if the substance of the project requires equipment, that component may be considered if it is demonstrated that such equipment is unavailable on campus and is instrumental to the project on a case-by-case approved basis.
    • Faculty teaching release is not funded by this grant.
    • Funds will be made available no later than November 30th, 2018 after recipients attend an introductory 2-hour on-boarding session. Category 1 funds must be expended no later than August 31st, 2019, and Category 2 funds must be expended no later than April 15th, 2019.
    • Brief final reports at project completion and/or close of the granting period are required, including an outline of fund expenditures. Any unspent funds will be returned to the Library and Archives.

Reporting and Deliverables

 For Category 1 – Creation and Adaptation grants:
A mid-term report is due April 15, 2019, and final reports and links to materials created must be submitted to the Library OER Grant Committee by August 31, 2019. Upon completion of the project, a presentation must be made during Open Access Week (October 2019).

For Category 2 – Review and Adoption grants:

Final two-page report and links to materials created must be submitted to the Library OER Grant Committee by April 15, 2019. Upon completion of the project, a short presentation must be made during Open Access Week (October 2019).

Acknowledgment and Licensing

Grant recipients are required to credit the RULA Open Educational Resources (OER) Grants in any publications, conference proceedings, or media appearances resulting from the funded project.

All materials created via these funds must be licensed under a Creative Commons CC-BY license, or a CC-BY-NC license and indicate that they were funded by a RULA Open Educational Resources (OER) Grants.

Assessment

Groups will be interviewed at end of project for feedback and a follow-up interview will be done after in-classroom pilots.

Application Process

To apply for a grant, please submit a completed application form to RULA by 4 pm September 28, 2018. Grant recipients will be announced October 22nd, 2018.   If you have questions, please feel free to contact either Ann Ludbrook aludbrook@ryerson.ca ext. 6910, or Sally Wilson swilson@ryerson.ca ext. 556898, or email librarygrants@ryerson.ca.

Come Celebrate World IP day with us – April 26th from 4-6 in the Collaboratory

You are invited to celebrate World IP day with us on Thursday April 26th from 4-6 pm at our IP Open House in the Library’s Collaboratory in the SLC.

Established by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO),  World Intellectual Property Day occurs every April 26th to recognize the role that intellectual property rights (patents, trademarks, industrial designs, copyright) play in encouraging innovation and creativity.
 
Please join us at an open house from 4pm – 6pm to learn about what supports are available at Ryerson to move your ideas from the lab to the market place.  Drop by for a cookie and to talk to OPVRI and Library staff and external IP experts  who can answer your questions about patents, trademarks, and copyrights.   You can also explore the  Ryerson Library Collaboratory, a just launched is a space and initiative in the 3rd floor of the Library that provides faculty and their research teams with space and technology resources to facilitate research and course development. 
 
This year WIPO is celebrating women and IP, see Powering Change: Women in Innovation and Creativity on the WIPO site.

Ryerson Library & Archives Celebrates Open Education Week March 5-9th

This week March 5-9th, 2018 is Open Education Week!

What is Open Education? It is an educational movement that is committed to producing teaching resources that can be used and then reused by other educators without formally seeking permission. In this model creators of educational content freely release their materials to the public. Other educators can then deliver the material freely to their students, as long as they attribute the original creator. These resources are most commonly made available under Creative Commons licences which also the material to be freely used for education.

Open textbooks, like open courses, are created by experts and then made freely available to the public. Projects like the eCampusOntario Open Textbook Library give instructors a way to find free-to-share material, and great resources like the Creative Commons search can help anyone find free to use images and music. Watch this blog to learn more about exciting projects happening at Ryerson University throughout the week.

Ryerson University Library & Archives is listing and/or hosting the following events for Open Education Week 2018.

1) Ontario Council of University Libraries Webinar: Voices of OER

Time: Monday, March 5, 2018 11:00am-12:30pm

ILC Lab, LIB272 Ron D.Besse Information Commons, 2nd floor of the Library (Updated to LIB192)

This webinar will offer a number of perspectives on the emerging movement of OER, capturing the voices of teaching faculty, students and instructional developers. Offered as a collaborative session with support from the Ontario Council of University Libraries and the eCampusOntario funded project Open Textbook Start-up Project (a collaboration between Brock University, University of Windsor and University of Toronto) this 1.5-hour webinar will explore a number of practical issues around OER in Ontario.

Speakers:

Jessica O’Reilly, Instructional Developer (Faculty), Cambrian College
Helen DeWaard, Sessional Instructor, Lakehead University
Landon Tulk, Student, University of Windsor
Listen on your own here: https://www.openeducationweek.org/events/voices-of-oer

2) Open Your Textbook: Adopting, Adapting or Creating Your Own Open Textbook

Time: Tuesday, March 6th, 2018, 12:00- 2:00pm

Location: POD 372

Join Michelle Schwartz, Instructional Design & Research Strategist, Ann Ludbrook, Copyright Librarian, and Sally Wilson, Web Librarian, for an introduction to open textbooks. Learn how to adopt, adapt, and create your own open textbook using Ryerson’s new Pressbooks platform. Open textbooks provide instructors with the opportunity to create texts uniquely tailored to their own courses. They also save students money. OER Fellow Maureen Glynn and Wendy Freeman, Director of e-Learning will lead a discussion with Ryerson faculty members about their experiences creating open textbooks.

3) SPARC Webcast: Collaborating Across Institutions to Advance Open Education

The Open Education movement has grown dramatically in recent years. Much of this growth is the result of innovative OER programs and initiatives that span multiple institutions. Although challenging, these types of initiatives have the potential to impact the largest number of students and go far in making open the default in education. This webcast will highlight system and state/provincial-wide OER initiatives at SPARC member institutions.

March 7th,  2018 2:00-3:00pm

Location: SLC508

Speakers:

Michelle Reed, Open Education Librarian, University of Texas at Arlington Libraries: Mark McBride, Library Senior Strategist, SUNY System Administration;  Amanda Coolidge, Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus; Grace Atkins, Outreach and Open Education Librarian, University of Missouri Libraries

4) Open Education Week Textbook Table

Thursday, March 8th, 2018 12:00-4:00pm

Location: Ron D.Besse Information Commons, Main Floor Library

Drop by and learn more about open textbooks and open educational resources. Flips through real open textbooks from eCampusOntario!

5) OEW-a-palooza.

Friday, March 9th, 2018 9:00-9:30am

Location: Updated to LIB386C

Listen to 6 five-minute stories about open education projects in Ontario, one speaker is Sally Wilson from Ryerson University Library & Archives. This will be 30-minute time slot as part of a global pop-up conference where people tell stories about their projects and what they have accomplished during Open Education Week.

This is part of a 24-hour event running around the clock March 8-9th: OEWeek 2- Hour Web-a-thon where you can hear from OER advocates around the world.

Fair Dealing Week: Copyright Review 2018

Happy Fair Dealing Week!
Why are we celebrating this week – especially in Canada?
Fair dealing defines important users rights allowed by Canadian laws. These user rights give Canadian citizens the ability to use fair dealing as an exception to the exclusive rights of copyright holders to control the copying and distributing of their content. Without fair dealing, this exclusive right could mean that, other than an insubstantial amount of a work, the work could never be copied without the permission of the copyright holder. User’s rights in the form of fair dealing mean that some copying is allowed without permission – for certain socially valuable purposes and for short amounts of a work.
Have a look at Student Life without Fair Dealing to get an idea about how important fair dealing can be in an educational environment. Without fair dealing you would not be able to do many of the things you do everyday as a student – use an image in an assignment that you are handing in, share an article with your group project team, photocopy a chapter you need from a library book so you can read it at home.
Luckily for students and educators some of the copying of works that we do in our learning and teaching are covered by fair dealing. For example fair dealing purposes include private study, research, criticism, review and education and parody and satire. Much of what students and educators do on a daily basis would be really really hard without this user’s right. Student and faculty ability to do effective research, use content in criticism and papers, teach and share information would be seriously inhibited. Fair dealing is really important because it allows a freer flow of information to happen in an educational setting – it promotes learning and scholarship. So celebrate Fair Dealing – it is a user’s right that Canadians should use, not lose.
This year celebrating fair dealing  is especially important, because it is 5 years since the scope of fair dealing in Canada was expanded to include education.  After 5 years the government calls for a review of the new Copyright Act, which will happen this year. The website Fair Dealing Canada gives you an opportunity to tell your story of how fair dealing helps you educate others or be educated. Add your story there and help convince the government that this user’s right is very important to your education.

Fair Dealing Week 2018 Event on February 26th

The week of February 26th is Fair Use/ Fair Dealing Week – an annual event to highlight, celebrate and educate about fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions.  As part of our celebration of Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week, the Library is hosting a panel discussion, Copyright and Education: 2018 Update

At this panel presentation, the speakers will review significant legal developments in the areas of fair dealing and copyright, which impact on the educational ​use of copyright materials.  This includes the recent ruling in the Access Copyright v. York University case, as well as the federal government’s current ​ review of the Copyright Act.  These developments will be of interest to instructors, faculty, and librarians​​, and others l​ooking ​to ensure legal compliance with copyrighted materials in the classroom.  Participants will also learn about the available supports at the Library to ensure copyright compliance, including the Library’s One Stop Course Reading Service, Open Educational Resources and Creative Commons licensing.

Date: Monday Feb. 26th, 2018

Location: SLC508

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Speakers:

Julia Shin Doi, General Counsel General Counsel and Secretary of the Board of Governors

Carol Shepstone, Chief Librarian

Ann Ludbrook, Copyright and Scholarly Engagement Librarian

 

Open Access Textbooks: Open Education Week 2016

facebook-e6e4a0223c35226e0e63c35e730fc9c2

 

A Guest Blog By Michelle Schwartz of the LTO for Open Education Week 2016

In February, Ryerson was excited to host Rajiv Jhangiani, a faculty member from Kwantlen Polytechnic University, for a talk on his research into the use of open textbooks to teach psychology. Open textbooks are defined as textbooks to which the copyright holder has assigned an open license, which allows anyone the right to access, reformat, and customize the textbook to best meet their needs. These textbooks can be downloaded or printed in hard copy for a small cost via print-on-demand. The author, rather than a publishing company, retains the copyright, and the textbooks are often peer reviewed.

Dr. Jhangiani is the author of two open textbooks hosted by the BC Open Textbook Project. The Open Textbook Project is an initiative by the government of British Columbia to make education more accessible. By developing open access textbooks for the subject areas with the highest enrollments in the province, British Columbia hoped to reduce the financial burden on students. The project has grown steadily over the course of the last few years, and as of March 2016, could boast of the following statistics:

Number of BC Open Textbooks: 139
Number of students using open textbooks: 12,159
Number of faculty adopting open textbooks: 110
Number of institutions adopting open textbooks: 26 (21 Public, 5 Private)
Student savings: $1,215,900 – $1,540,680

As an example of an open textbook, Dr. Jhangiani’s Research Methods in Psychology is in its 2nd Canadian edition. It can be downloaded for free in a multitude of formats, from PDF to epub, and it can be printed on demand for a small fee – $10.90 for black and white, or $32.25 for a colour version. As a comparison, a textbook on the same topic from a major publishing company is currently retailing on Amazon.ca for $276.

Though the importance of this cost difference to students cannot be understated, perhaps an even greater benefit of open textbooks was brought up by Dr. Jhangiani at his talk – by publishing with an open license, Dr. Jhangiani felt he had much more latitude to provide unique Canadian examples that he thought would be most beneficial to his students, without the pressure from a publishing company to try to address larger markets. Because the textbook is published with an open license, any educator can take the textbook, use the chapters that they like best, and replace Dr. Jhangiani’s examples and case studies with the material that is most relevant to their course. This flexibility is the strength of the open textbook model!

If you are interested in adopting an open textbook in your course, check out the offerings available at BC Campus, Open Stax College from Rice University, and the Open Textbook Library from the University of Minnesota.

If you have questions about adopting an open textbook or you have thoughts on how you might like to use them in your course, contact us at the LTO, michelle.schwartz@ryerson.ca, ext. 2094.

The Ryerson Library and Archives can also assist in finding open access educational resources to use in your teaching – please contact your Subject Librarian , call Ann Ludbrook at ext. 6910  aludbrook@ryerson.ca or have a look at the Ryerson Library Open Access Educational Resources Guide.

Happy Open Education Resources Week March 7th-March 11th!

facebook-e6e4a0223c35226e0e63c35e730fc9c2

What are Open Education Resources (OER)?

OERs are educational works created by other instructors like lectures, tests, syllabus, assignments, textbooks, journal articles, case studies etc. that the author decides they want to let other educators use freely in their teaching. OERs can be used and reused freely for educational purposes because the author has freely released the work to the public for that use – usually using one of the six types of a Creative Commons  licence. These licences allow different levels of use – some allow adaptation and even commercial use and some do not. All Creative Commons licences require citation. The best OER resources are governed by a principle of  “The 5 Rs”.

“The 5 Rs” – in order for a resource to qualify as an OER users should be able to

•   Reuse – use the content in a wide range of ways (e.g., in a class, in a study group, on a website, in a video)

•   Revise – adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language)

•   Remix – combine the original or revised content with other open content to create something new (e.g., incorporate the content into a mashup)

•   Redistribute – share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g., give a copy of the content to a friend)

•   Retain – make, own, and control copies of the content

(The 5rs  is based on original writing by David Wiley, which was published freely under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license at: http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/3221.)

In Canada there are some leaders of Open Educational Resources paving the way to support instructors who want to use resources like these that are free of copyright restrictions. One of these is the BCcampusOpenED resource that hosts Open Access textbooks, including peer-reviewed Canadian editions, and has had adoptions of these textbooks by more than 26 Canadian institutions, saving students over a million dollars of textbooks cost to date. In Ontario eCampus Ontario hosts Open Access educational resources and guides you to other open materials. Ryerson University Open Learning has Open Access modules created by Ryerson instructors such as videos from The Naked Entrepreneur and a module Therapeutic Communication and Mental Health Assessment. Michelle Schwartz at The Learning and Teaching Office has created a great best practices resource for faculty and instructors who want to explore open access educational resources called The Open Access Classroom. Open Access Education resources are free for you to use and reuse and adapt to fit your teaching aims as long as you cite the source. Perhaps most importantly these resources are free of copyright restrictions and you can provide them to your students free of charge.

Knit Happens! Drop-In at the DME

Do you want to learn how to knit? From librarians?  Of course you do!  

May (left) and Sally (right), talking about their knitting fails...it even happens to the pros!

May (left) and Sally (right), talking about their knitting fails…it even happens to the pros!

On Mondays at 11 a.m., join Trina Grover, Collection Services Librarian, May Yan, ER Discovery & Access Librarian and Sally Wilson, Web Services Librarian, in the Library’s Digital Media Experience (DME) lab on the 3rd floor of the Student Learning Centre (SLC).  No registration needed, just drop in to work on your knit projects with fellow knitters, or learn some knitting basics from these crafty ladies. Everyone is welcome, regardless of their skill level. 

Trina in the knitting zone…

Trina in the knitting zone…

Even if you’re an experienced knitter looking for a knitting community on campus or just somewhere to work, feel free to join the group. The knitting skills learned at this drop-in will help students progress to future workshops planned around knit-wearable projects and computational fabrics / wearable computing, which may be of interest to those with knitting experience.  

The Library’s Digital Media Experience (DME) Lab is a new space on the 3rd floor of the Student Learning Centre (SLC) designed to help all Ryerson students learn basic and advanced digital skill-sets, while exposing them to new and emerging technologies.

2014 Student Employee of the Year Award Winners

On April 15th, Ryerson Library hosted the annual Student Staff Appreciation Party. This celebration  honours the Student Employee of the Year Award recipients. The Student Employee of the Year Award  recognises students who have achieved excellence in their work environment, and the winners receive an award as well as a cash gift. The selection committee had a difficult time selecting just one recipient this year, and  ultimately recognized two Ryerson students: Romana Naz and Sarah Hubbard pictured below with RULA’s chief librarian, Madeleine Lefebvre. This event also recognized graduating student employees including Hanny Sierra, who is the first recipient of the Emerging Professional Award offered by the Career Centre, and the first Experiential Learning Work Study Program Award. Congratulations to the award recipients, and we wish you the best of luck in the future!

Romana Sarah

Romana Naz & Sarah Hubbard pictured with chief librarian, Madeleine Lefebvre.

 
 

One-Stop Course Readings Team Wins Blue & Gold!

cropblue&gold

Congratulations to the One-Stop Course Readings Service Team for winning the President’s Blue and Gold Award of Excellence! The One-Stop Course Readings Service  makes high-demand course readings available to students over the duration of their courses. This award recognizes the efforts of ten librarians and technicians in addition to several library assistants and four work study students at Ryerson Library who collaborate to provide faculty and students with convenient and copyright compliant access to scholarly articles for their course readings. This service team works alongside the Bookstore, with support from Digital Media Projects, Computing and Communications Services, and the Chang School to provide a service unique to Ryerson Library: one that exemplifies Ryerson’s values of collaboration, innovation, and integrity. Congratulations to all the members of the One-Stop Course Readings Service Team  for winning Blue & Gold