Open Education Week March 9-13th, 2015

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This week is Open Education Week!

What is Open Education? It is an educational movement that is committed to producing teaching resources that can be used and then reused by other educators without formally seeking permission. In this model creators of educational content freely release their materials to the public. Other educators can then deliver the material freely to their students, as long as they attribute the original creator. These resources are most commonly made available under Creative Commons licences.  Many MOOCs, open courses, and regular classes now routinely use this kind of content, because there is no need to get copyright clearance and they can be publicly posted on the web.

Open textbooks, like open courses, are created by experts and then made freely available to the public. Projects like the BCCampus OpenEd textbook initiative and the OER Commons give instructors a way to find free-to-share material, and great resources like the Creative Commons search can help anyone find free to use images and music.

Ryerson University Library & Archives is hosting a few events this week to celebrate Open Education Week 2015.

 

Tips for Finding Free Music, Images, and More: Drop-In

Today 12-1 pm, March 9th, Student Learning Centre (SLC) Rm 515

Find free music & images and more to use in your projects – both commercial and school based. This is a drop-in session.


 

Is there a Free Textbook in Your Future?

12-1 pm, March 10th, 2015, Student Learning Centre (SLC) Rm 514

Can you imagine a world were some of the textbooks that are used to teach courses you take are free? Find out more about the Open Access Textbook movement.


 

The Affordable Classroom: Open Access Textbooks (LTO and the Library)

12-2pm March 12th, 2015 POD-372

Do you ever worry about the rising cost of textbooks for your students? Are you interested in hearing about possible alternatives to the traditional textbook model, like open access textbooks? In this workshop you will learn about new Canadian-lead open access textbook repositories, and other open access textbook resources that are freely available on the web to use in your teaching. If you are interested in building your own open access textbook to use in your classroom, this workshop will provide you with the necessary building blocks to get started.

Sign up here

 

 

Tri-Agency Open Access Policy Released

After some delay, the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications has been released. The policy requires that any peer-reviewed publication(s) arising from grants received from any of the three agencies (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC) be made freely accessible within 12 months of publication. The new policy comes into force for any grants awarded after May 1st, 2015. It’s worth noting that CIHR has had an open access policy since 2008.

Researchers funded by any of these three agencies are required to either:

1) Publish in a journal that allows immediate open access or one that permits open access within 12 months of initial publication; and/or

2) Deposit the final, peer-reviewed author version of your article in an online open access repository, such as RULA’s Digital Repository.

It is important to note that option 2 does not require any payments to publishers, but option 1 might incur an open access article processing fee.

The Ryerson Library maintains deposit accounts, to cover open access charges, with PLoS, Biomed Central, and Hindawi. In addition, we accept applications for funding from other journals, subject to criteria outlined in our Open Access Author Fund policy page.

Celebrate Fair Dealing Week!

Why are we celebrating this week – especially in Canada?

Fair dealing defines important users rights allowed by Canadian laws. These user rights give Canadian citizens the ability to use fair dealing as an exception to the exclusive rights of copyright holders to control the copying and distributing of their content. This exclusive right means that, other than an insubstantial amount of a work, the work can’t be copied without the permission of the copyright holder. User’s rights in the form of fair dealing mean that some copying is allowed without permission – for certain purposes and for short amounts of a work. Luckily for students and educators some of the copying of works that we do in our learning and teaching are covered by fair dealing. For example fair dealing purposes include private study, research, criticism, review and education. Much of what students and educators do on a daily basis would be really really hard without this user’s right. Student and faculty ability to do effective research, use content in criticism and papers, teach and share information would be seriously inhibited if most uses had to always have permission be granted when someone was only copying a short excerpt. Fair dealing is really important because it allows a freer flow of information to happen in an educational setting – it promotes learning and scholarship. So celebrate Fair Dealing – it is a user’s right that Canadians should use, not lose.

The Copyright Modernization Act is now in Force

Bill C-11 (The Copyright Modernization Act) Update

Many sections of Bill C-11 (The Copyright Modernization Act) including fair dealing exceptions for education and other educational and library specific provisions are now in force as of Nov. 7th, 2012. Ryerson University is currently working on a new fair dealing policy, and our copyright pages wil be soon updated to reflect all the changes.

Highlights:

  • Fair dealing for the purpose of education, and parody and satire are now exceptions
  • Public performance rights are no longer needed to show a movie or video in a classroom setting
  • Material from the internet that does not have clearly posted warnings against  reuse can be reused in course materials

Know your Rights: Publishing and Academic Freedom in a Digital World.

Have you recently published in a journal? Do you know your rights as an
author? Join us for a presentation and discussion focusing on how you can
protect your author rights and reuse, republish and redistribute your work.
Learn about how to protect your intellectual property through addenda to
copyright transfer agreements and avoid the pitfalls associated with impact
factors. We will also discuss the value of open access publishing and
Digital Commons @ Ryerson, our institutional repository.

Presenter: Brian Cameron, Digital Initiatives Librarian, Ryerson University
Library and Archives

This presentation will take place on Friday, October 26 from 12-2 in the
OVPRI board room (1 Dundas Street, YDI-1134). Lunch will be served at 12
p.m., with the talk starting at 12:45.

Please RSVP to bcameron@ryerson.ca by October 24th, as space is limited.

Copyright Update on Fair Dealing and Bill C-11

Supreme Court of Canada’s Decisions on Fair Dealing

Several Supreme Court of Canada rulings on copyright were made on July 12, 2012. These decisions should broaden the interpretation of the Copyright Act fair dealing provisions for materials copied for use in university teaching. Presently the AUCC is working on updating their fair dealing guidelines based on the recent Supreme Court of Canada’s rulings and in light of the new Copyright Modernization Act. When these new guidelines are released, the Ryerson University Fair Dealing Policy will be updated to reflect this advice.

At present the current Ryerson University Fair Dealing Policy is still in effect, dated August 31st, 2011. Please use this document to make fair dealing assessments for your Fall 2012 courses. Once Ryerson University’s policy is updated the library  will offer several short informational sessions regarding the new fair dealing guidelines. Please check here to see the schedules for upcoming Copyright information sessions.

Bill C-11 (The Copyright Modernization Act)

While Bill C-11 (The Copyright Modernization Act) received Royal Assent on June 29, 2012 an order-in-council decision must be issued before it is in force. The current Copyright Act is still in effect until that time. Please use the current FAQ’s for use of course materials in the Physical Classroom and Virtual Classroom environment. These FAQ’s will be updated once The Copyright Modernization Act is in effect.