Ryerson Library & Archives Celebrates Open Education Week March 5-9th

This week March 5-9th, 2018 is Open Education Week!

What is Open Education? It is an educational movement that is committed to producing teaching resources that can be used and then reused by other educators without formally seeking permission. In this model creators of educational content freely release their materials to the public. Other educators can then deliver the material freely to their students, as long as they attribute the original creator. These resources are most commonly made available under Creative Commons licences which also the material to be freely used for education.

Open textbooks, like open courses, are created by experts and then made freely available to the public. Projects like the eCampusOntario Open Textbook Library give instructors a way to find free-to-share material, and great resources like the Creative Commons search can help anyone find free to use images and music. Watch this blog to learn more about exciting projects happening at Ryerson University throughout the week.

Ryerson University Library & Archives is listing and/or hosting the following events for Open Education Week 2018.

1) Ontario Council of University Libraries Webinar: Voices of OER

Time: Monday, March 5, 2018 11:00am-12:30pm

ILC Lab, LIB272 Ron D.Besse Information Commons, 2nd floor of the Library (Updated to LIB192)

This webinar will offer a number of perspectives on the emerging movement of OER, capturing the voices of teaching faculty, students and instructional developers. Offered as a collaborative session with support from the Ontario Council of University Libraries and the eCampusOntario funded project Open Textbook Start-up Project (a collaboration between Brock University, University of Windsor and University of Toronto) this 1.5-hour webinar will explore a number of practical issues around OER in Ontario.

Speakers:

Jessica O’Reilly, Instructional Developer (Faculty), Cambrian College
Helen DeWaard, Sessional Instructor, Lakehead University
Landon Tulk, Student, University of Windsor
Listen on your own here: https://www.openeducationweek.org/events/voices-of-oer

2) Open Your Textbook: Adopting, Adapting or Creating Your Own Open Textbook

Time: Tuesday, March 6th, 2018, 12:00- 2:00pm

Location: POD 372

Join Michelle Schwartz, Instructional Design & Research Strategist, Ann Ludbrook, Copyright Librarian, and Sally Wilson, Web Librarian, for an introduction to open textbooks. Learn how to adopt, adapt, and create your own open textbook using Ryerson’s new Pressbooks platform. Open textbooks provide instructors with the opportunity to create texts uniquely tailored to their own courses. They also save students money. OER Fellow Maureen Glynn and Wendy Freeman, Director of e-Learning will lead a discussion with Ryerson faculty members about their experiences creating open textbooks.

3) SPARC Webcast: Collaborating Across Institutions to Advance Open Education

The Open Education movement has grown dramatically in recent years. Much of this growth is the result of innovative OER programs and initiatives that span multiple institutions. Although challenging, these types of initiatives have the potential to impact the largest number of students and go far in making open the default in education. This webcast will highlight system and state/provincial-wide OER initiatives at SPARC member institutions.

March 7th,  2018 2:00-3:00pm

Location: SLC508

Speakers:

Michelle Reed, Open Education Librarian, University of Texas at Arlington Libraries: Mark McBride, Library Senior Strategist, SUNY System Administration;  Amanda Coolidge, Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus; Grace Atkins, Outreach and Open Education Librarian, University of Missouri Libraries

4) Open Education Week Textbook Table

Thursday, March 8th, 2018 12:00-4:00pm

Location: Ron D.Besse Information Commons, Main Floor Library

Drop by and learn more about open textbooks and open educational resources. Flips through real open textbooks from eCampusOntario!

5) OEW-a-palooza.

Friday, March 9th, 2018 9:00-9:30am

Location: Updated to LIB386C

Listen to 6 five-minute stories about open education projects in Ontario, one speaker is Sally Wilson from Ryerson University Library & Archives. This will be 30-minute time slot as part of a global pop-up conference where people tell stories about their projects and what they have accomplished during Open Education Week.

This is part of a 24-hour event running around the clock March 8-9th: OEWeek 2- Hour Web-a-thon where you can hear from OER advocates around the world.

Fair Dealing Week: Copyright Review 2018

Happy Fair Dealing Week!
Why are we celebrating this week – especially in Canada?
Fair dealing defines important users rights allowed by Canadian laws. These user rights give Canadian citizens the ability to use fair dealing as an exception to the exclusive rights of copyright holders to control the copying and distributing of their content. Without fair dealing, this exclusive right could mean that, other than an insubstantial amount of a work, the work could never be copied without the permission of the copyright holder. User’s rights in the form of fair dealing mean that some copying is allowed without permission – for certain socially valuable purposes and for short amounts of a work.
Have a look at Student Life without Fair Dealing to get an idea about how important fair dealing can be in an educational environment. Without fair dealing you would not be able to do many of the things you do everyday as a student – use an image in an assignment that you are handing in, share an article with your group project team, photocopy a chapter you need from a library book so you can read it at home.
Luckily for students and educators some of the copying of works that we do in our learning and teaching are covered by fair dealing. For example fair dealing purposes include private study, research, criticism, review and education and parody and satire. Much of what students and educators do on a daily basis would be really really hard without this user’s right. Student and faculty ability to do effective research, use content in criticism and papers, teach and share information would be seriously inhibited. Fair dealing is really important because it allows a freer flow of information to happen in an educational setting – it promotes learning and scholarship. So celebrate Fair Dealing – it is a user’s right that Canadians should use, not lose.
This year celebrating fair dealing  is especially important, because it is 5 years since the scope of fair dealing in Canada was expanded to include education.  After 5 years the government calls for a review of the new Copyright Act, which will happen this year. The website Fair Dealing Canada gives you an opportunity to tell your story of how fair dealing helps you educate others or be educated. Add your story there and help convince the government that this user’s right is very important to your education.

Fair Dealing Week 2018 Event on February 26th

The week of February 26th is Fair Use/ Fair Dealing Week – an annual event to highlight, celebrate and educate about fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions.  As part of our celebration of Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week, the Library is hosting a panel discussion, Copyright and Education: 2018 Update

At this panel presentation, the speakers will review significant legal developments in the areas of fair dealing and copyright, which impact on the educational ​use of copyright materials.  This includes the recent ruling in the Access Copyright v. York University case, as well as the federal government’s current ​ review of the Copyright Act.  These developments will be of interest to instructors, faculty, and librarians​​, and others l​ooking ​to ensure legal compliance with copyrighted materials in the classroom.  Participants will also learn about the available supports at the Library to ensure copyright compliance, including the Library’s One Stop Course Reading Service, Open Educational Resources and Creative Commons licensing.

Date: Monday Feb. 26th, 2018

Location: SLC508

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Speakers:

Julia Shin Doi, General Counsel General Counsel and Secretary of the Board of Governors

Carol Shepstone, Chief Librarian

Ann Ludbrook, Copyright and Scholarly Engagement Librarian

 

ORCID Author Identifier: Distinguish Yourself in Three Easy Steps

Faculty members and graduate students are invited to attend a drop-in session where they will receive hands-on assistance in setting up and populating an ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) account.

In order for scholarly work to be found in a global network of researchers, it is essential to differentiate authors. ORCID makes this easy by attaching an unambiguous identity to publications, funding and other research activities. As researchers collaborate across disciplines, institutions and geographic borders, having a unique author or researcher ID ensures credit for your scholarly output.

ORCID is an open, non-profit, community-driven effort to create and maintain a registry of unique researcher identifiers and link research activities and outputs to these identifiers. Many publishers and funding agencies now require or encourage authors to apply for an ORCID.

Drop-in dates and location:

Wednesday Oct 25th, 12:00 to 1:00 – SLC 516

Thursday Oct 26th, 12:00 to 1:00 – SLC 516

Wednesday Nov 1st, 12:00 to 1:00 – SLC 516

If you are not able to attend these sessions and would like to schedule a one-to-one appointment, please contact Brian Cameron at bcameron@ryerson.ca or Naomi Eichenlaub at neichenl@ryerson.ca.

Please see this video for more information about ORCID.

https://vimeo.com/97150912

Publishers Send Take Down Notices to ResearchGate

If you have a ResearchGate profile, you should be aware that 5 publishers, including Elsevier, Wiley, and the American Chemical Society, have sent take-down notices to ResearchGate. The publishers argue that 40% of the papers uploaded to ResearchGate are copyrighted. In 2013, Elsevier made a similar demand to Academia.edu.

In a further move, Elsevier and the American Chemical Society are taking legal action to prevent ResearchGate from uploading copyrighted content from the web. The website will prompt you to add these full-text articles to your profile. In most cases, authors who do so will have breached their copyright transfer agreement.

Researchers who are required to comply with the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications must be aware that uploading articles to ResearchGate, Academia.edu, or similar sites does not satisfy the policy requirements. Researchers at Ryerson should be using RULA’s Digital Repository. For assistance with the repository and open access publishing, contact Brian Cameron at bcameron@ryerson.ca.

Please see Times Higher Education for a brief article about this issue.

April 26th is World Intellectual Property Day

April 26th is World Intellectual Property Day and is celebrated around the world. Launched by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in 2000 the day was created to raise awareness about how intellectual property like patents, trademarks and copyright are both used and in turn foster creativity.  This year’s theme is Digital Creativity: Culture Reimagined.

Universities are both creators of intellectual property through faculty, instructor, researcher and student output, but are also consumers of intellectual property. Ryerson University Library and Archives spends millions of dollars per year on book and digital journal subscription purchasing. Most of these on-line journal articles are not publicly available to those outside of a university environment without a fee. At universities we are digitally privileged because we pay a substantial amount yearly for access to this content.

The purchases universities make support publishers and at the same time give instructors, researchers and students timely access to the latest scholarly information that can be used in their courses and for their research. Ryerson researchers are also part of the creative cycle as they create and publish new works citing the work that has gone before them.

More about:
World Intellectual Property Day
WIPO

 

FACETS: New Canadian Open Access Journal

Faculty members looking for a new venue for sharing research will want to know about FACETS, a new multidisciplinary, peer reviewed open access journal published by Canadian Science Publishing. The journal publishes articles in the biological sciences, biomedicine and health, environmental science, engineering, physical sciences, and integrative sciences (such as ethics, public health, science policy, sustainability, etc.).

The creation of this journal is part of a larger shift in academic publishing away from traditional for-profit commercial publishers to an open access landscape that permits faculty members to retain copyright over their intellectual property and facilitate wider sharing of the results of their research. These and other open access benefits prompted the drafting of the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications, which now requires that research funded by NSERC, SSHRC, and CIHR be made open access.

Dr. Imogen Coe, Dean of the Faculty of Science at Ryerson and one of the editors for the new journal, notes that “The classic routes of publication are extraordinarily expensive for new researchers, for small labs with limited funds and for individuals all over the world who want access but get stuck with expensive paywalls.“

As a new journal, FACETS does not yet have an impact factor, a metric that reflects the average number of citations to articles recently published in a specific journal. Dr. Coe advises emerging researchers to “find a balance between impact factor and other measures of impact and contribution.” She also points out that some researchers mistakenly rely on impact factors as a measure of article quality. “Publication in the highest impact journal in the world – with no subsequent citations suggest that there was really no impact of the contribution. Publication in a low impact journal combined with huge numbers of citations suggests a truly impactful contribution.”

A major challenge for libraries supporting open access publishing is finding sustainable funding to support article processing fees (APCs). FACETS will charge an APC of $1350, which is less than most other APCs. The Ryerson Library provides some support for open access author fees via memberships with Biomed Central, the Public Library of Science, and Hindawi. For more information about open access publishing, the library’s open access author fund, and our Digital Repository, please see: http://learn.library.ryerson.ca/scholcomm.

Open Access Textbooks: Open Education Week 2016

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A Guest Blog By Michelle Schwartz of the LTO for Open Education Week 2016

In February, Ryerson was excited to host Rajiv Jhangiani, a faculty member from Kwantlen Polytechnic University, for a talk on his research into the use of open textbooks to teach psychology. Open textbooks are defined as textbooks to which the copyright holder has assigned an open license, which allows anyone the right to access, reformat, and customize the textbook to best meet their needs. These textbooks can be downloaded or printed in hard copy for a small cost via print-on-demand. The author, rather than a publishing company, retains the copyright, and the textbooks are often peer reviewed.

Dr. Jhangiani is the author of two open textbooks hosted by the BC Open Textbook Project. The Open Textbook Project is an initiative by the government of British Columbia to make education more accessible. By developing open access textbooks for the subject areas with the highest enrollments in the province, British Columbia hoped to reduce the financial burden on students. The project has grown steadily over the course of the last few years, and as of March 2016, could boast of the following statistics:

Number of BC Open Textbooks: 139
Number of students using open textbooks: 12,159
Number of faculty adopting open textbooks: 110
Number of institutions adopting open textbooks: 26 (21 Public, 5 Private)
Student savings: $1,215,900 – $1,540,680

As an example of an open textbook, Dr. Jhangiani’s Research Methods in Psychology is in its 2nd Canadian edition. It can be downloaded for free in a multitude of formats, from PDF to epub, and it can be printed on demand for a small fee – $10.90 for black and white, or $32.25 for a colour version. As a comparison, a textbook on the same topic from a major publishing company is currently retailing on Amazon.ca for $276.

Though the importance of this cost difference to students cannot be understated, perhaps an even greater benefit of open textbooks was brought up by Dr. Jhangiani at his talk – by publishing with an open license, Dr. Jhangiani felt he had much more latitude to provide unique Canadian examples that he thought would be most beneficial to his students, without the pressure from a publishing company to try to address larger markets. Because the textbook is published with an open license, any educator can take the textbook, use the chapters that they like best, and replace Dr. Jhangiani’s examples and case studies with the material that is most relevant to their course. This flexibility is the strength of the open textbook model!

If you are interested in adopting an open textbook in your course, check out the offerings available at BC Campus, Open Stax College from Rice University, and the Open Textbook Library from the University of Minnesota.

If you have questions about adopting an open textbook or you have thoughts on how you might like to use them in your course, contact us at the LTO, michelle.schwartz@ryerson.ca, ext. 2094.

The Ryerson Library and Archives can also assist in finding open access educational resources to use in your teaching – please contact your Subject Librarian , call Ann Ludbrook at ext. 6910  aludbrook@ryerson.ca or have a look at the Ryerson Library Open Access Educational Resources Guide.

Happy Open Education Resources Week March 7th-March 11th!

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What are Open Education Resources (OER)?

OERs are educational works created by other instructors like lectures, tests, syllabus, assignments, textbooks, journal articles, case studies etc. that the author decides they want to let other educators use freely in their teaching. OERs can be used and reused freely for educational purposes because the author has freely released the work to the public for that use – usually using one of the six types of a Creative Commons  licence. These licences allow different levels of use – some allow adaptation and even commercial use and some do not. All Creative Commons licences require citation. The best OER resources are governed by a principle of  “The 5 Rs”.

“The 5 Rs” – in order for a resource to qualify as an OER users should be able to

•   Reuse – use the content in a wide range of ways (e.g., in a class, in a study group, on a website, in a video)

•   Revise – adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language)

•   Remix – combine the original or revised content with other open content to create something new (e.g., incorporate the content into a mashup)

•   Redistribute – share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g., give a copy of the content to a friend)

•   Retain – make, own, and control copies of the content

(The 5rs  is based on original writing by David Wiley, which was published freely under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license at: http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/3221.)

In Canada there are some leaders of Open Educational Resources paving the way to support instructors who want to use resources like these that are free of copyright restrictions. One of these is the BCcampusOpenED resource that hosts Open Access textbooks, including peer-reviewed Canadian editions, and has had adoptions of these textbooks by more than 26 Canadian institutions, saving students over a million dollars of textbooks cost to date. In Ontario eCampus Ontario hosts Open Access educational resources and guides you to other open materials. Ryerson University Open Learning has Open Access modules created by Ryerson instructors such as videos from The Naked Entrepreneur and a module Therapeutic Communication and Mental Health Assessment. Michelle Schwartz at The Learning and Teaching Office has created a great best practices resource for faculty and instructors who want to explore open access educational resources called The Open Access Classroom. Open Access Education resources are free for you to use and reuse and adapt to fit your teaching aims as long as you cite the source. Perhaps most importantly these resources are free of copyright restrictions and you can provide them to your students free of charge.

Celebrate Fair Dealing Week – Celebrate User’s Rights

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What would happen if everytime you wanted to use an image in an school assignment, instead of just crediting it – you had to write to the photographer for permission to use it? Or your instructor wanted to use that same image in a preszentation but they needed to wait to hear back from a publisher for permission before they could post it to D2L – and your test is Friday? What would happen if you wanted to photocopy a single chapter of a Library Reserve book to read at home – but first you needed the formal ok of the author? What about if you were working on a research assignment with a classmate and wanted to send a single article you scanned from a journal to them so they could read it too – but couldn’t because it would be considered copyright infringement. What if your professor could never upload anything ever for you to read to your class no matter if it is a just a few pages and important for your educational studies without it being against the law?
Luckily in Canada we have something called fair dealing, a copyright exception that gives you a user’s right to make and use short excepts of copyrighted materials for certain purposes such as education, private study, research and criticism and review – activities you do everyday as a student.  If that copyright exception – fair dealing – was not in Canadian laws and in the Copyright Act – that material would be unavailable for you to copy without a licence – which could limit your access to material that contain knowledge you need to learn. Much of what students and educators do on a daily basis would be really really hard without fair dealing.
Fair dealing is really important because it allows a freer flow of information to happen in an educational setting – it promotes learning and scholarship. Creator’s rights (an authors or publishers right to be compensated for the use of a work) is in balance with your right to use a short excerpt of a work without having to get the permission every time you use copyrighted material in your school work. So celebrate Fair Dealing – it is a user’s right that Canadians should use, not lose.

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