Fair Dealing Week: Copyright Review 2017

Why are we celebrating this week – especially in Canada?
Fair dealing defines important users rights allowed by Canadian laws. These user rights give Canadian citizens the ability to use fair dealing as an exception to the exclusive rights of copyright holders to control the copying and distributing of their content. Without fair dealing, this exclusive right could mean that, other than an insubstantial amount of a work, the work could never be copied without the permission of the copyright holder. User’s rights in the form of fair dealing mean that some copying is allowed without permission – for certain socially valuable purposes and for short amounts of a work.
Have a look at Student Life without Fair Dealing to get an idea about how important fair dealing can be in an educational environment. Luckily for students and educators some of the copying of works that we do in our learning and teaching are covered by fair dealing. For example fair dealing purposes include private study, research, criticism, review and education and parody and satire. Much of what students and educators do on a daily basis would be really really hard without this user’s right. Student and faculty ability to do effective research, use content in criticism and papers, teach and share information would be seriously inhibited. Fair dealing is really important because it allows a freer flow of information to happen in an educational setting – it promotes learning and scholarship. So celebrate Fair Dealing – it is a user’s right that Canadians should use, not lose.
This year celebrating fair dealing  is especially important, because it is 5 years since the scope of fair dealing in Canada was expanded to include education.  After 5 years the government plans to call a review of the new Copyright Act, which will happen late this year. The website Fair Dealing Canada gives you an opportunity to tell your story of how fair dealing helps you educate others or be educated. Add your story there and help convince the government that this user’s right is very important to your education.

 

Fair Dealing Week: February 20-24, 2017

To celebrate Fair Dealing Week the Library is holding a Copyright session for interested staff members at Ryerson University.


Date: Feb 21st, 2017
Time: 11am-12pm
Room: SLC508 (5th Floor, Student Learning Centre)

 

 

Fair Dealing and You: Copyright Guidelines for Staff at Ryerson

As a Ryerson staff member, if you are distributing copyrighted works as part of your job, it is important to learn about the fair dealing provision in the Copyright Act, and how it can be used. Understanding the limits of fair dealing is essential to your copyright compliance as an staff member at Ryerson and is particularly important now that Ryerson’s Access Copyright licence has expired.

Stay tuned for more updates throughout Fair Dealing Week!
See the Ryerson Fair Dealing Guideline here.

RULA remembers Stuart McLean

It is with great sadness that we learned of Stuart McLean’s passing yesterday. McLean had a deep connection to and history at Ryerson. He joined the Journalism department as faculty in 1985, and served for a time as the Director of the broadcast division of the School of Journalism. He retired in 2004.

You can explore his fonds in our archives and borrow his books from the library.

The Ryerson Library and Archives remembers him fondly, and extends our condolences to his family. Rest in peace, Stuart.

 

Update your outdated library links to ensure uninterrupted access

Access to the library’s online databases and other eContent has been upgraded to meet current security standards. As a result, users are required to authenticate both on and off campus in order to access electronic journal articles through the library’s databases.

If issues occur when connecting to the Library’s online resources through old library links and bookmarks, please refer to the current A-Z Database List to find and update these library links. This will ensure continued access to the library’s electronic resources, including online journals and journal articles.

Please email erm@ryerson.ca with any questions you have about this upgrade.

Madeleine Lefebvre Receives Errol Aspevig Award for Outstanding Academic Leadership

Congratulations to Madeleine Lefebvre, Chief Librarian of Ryerson University, who was the recent recipient of the Errol Aspevig Award for Outstanding Academic Leadership. The award recognizes individuals who have advanced the mission of Ryerson University through outstanding academic leadership and who have contributed significantly to the enhancement of academic life at Ryerson and beyond.

Madeleine will receive this award at the Ryerson Awards Night, scheduled on Monday, March 27, 2017 from 4 p.m. at the Eaton Chelsea Hotel, 33 Gerrard St W.

Madeleine has been the Chief Librarian of Ryerson University since 2007. She has previously held Chief Librarian appointments at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Mount Royal College in Calgary, Alberta. She is a Fellow of the UK Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, and an Associate of the Australian Library and Information Association. She was also the 2003/2004 President of the Canadian Library Association. In 2005, Scarecrow Press published her book, The Romance of Libraries. Madeleine has held a sustained interest in planning library space and new buildings that address the need for “congenial space” for students, and has played a major role in the design and development of Ryerson’s award-winning Student Learning Centre.

Learn more about Madeleine receiving the 2017 Errol Aspevig Award for Outstanding Academic Leadership award here.

Authentication and E-Reserve

Please note that in order to access electronic articles through the library’s databases, users are required to authenticate both on and off campus.

With E-reserve articles, even when logged into D2L Brightspace in one browser, i.e. Chrome or Firefox, users may still be prompted to sign in again when accessing an e-Reserve article. This is because ARES (the system housing e-Reserve articles) often defaults to IE (Internet Explorer) when opening articles, even when the user is already logged in under another browser.

This change was implemented to increase security for library electronic resources.

7th floor of the Library fully operational again.

The water damage on the 7th floor of the Library has been addressed, and the floor is fully operational again.  Thanks to Ryerson’s Campus Facilities & Sustainability (CFS) department, cleanup and repair in the area is now complete and students are welcomed to make use of the Library’s 7th floor again.

We thank you for your patience.

Course Reading Requests for Winter 2017

Any faculty or instructors interested in using the One-Stop Course Reading Service  for the 2017 Winter term should submit their course reading requests by November 18, 2016. After that, requests will be processed on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Online: The Library’s E-Reserve service provides course reading support via D2L Brightspace. To order readings, instructors can use the e-reserve request form inside their D2L course OR send a reading list with full citations and the needed by dates to reserve@ryerson.ca. Please review instructions on Placing items on Reserve.

Print: If you prefer print, order print course packs sold at the Campus Store OR place course readings in the Print Reserve collection at the Library. If you order print course packs from copy shops other than the Bookstore, only use approved vendors.

Reminder: Permissions are required for material that exceeds 10% of a work or one chapter (whichever is larger). Permission needs to be requested each term the material is being used through reserve@ryerson.ca.

Catherine Middleton – 2016 Inductee to the Library’s Open Access Wall of Fame

The Library is pleased to announce the 2016 inductee to our Open Access Wall of Fame, Professor Catherine Middleton from the Ted Rogers School of Information Technology Management (TRSM). The Wall of Fame honours researchers who have demonstrated a commitment to ensuring their research is open and available to all. Open Access material is scholarly work that is made legally available with no restrictions so the anyone can access the full text.

Professor Middleton is a current Canada Research Chair, and a consistent contributor to the Library’s Digital Repository, a space for collecting, preserving, and providing online access to research and teaching materials created by the Ryerson community. Available in the repository are theses, dissertations, articles, technical reports, working papers, conference papers, etc., which are freely available to anyone.  Upon her induction to the Open Access Wall of Fame, Professor Middleton made the following statement:  “Publishing work in open access venues like the RULA Digital Repository is crucial to make academic research accessible to broad and diverse audiences, including policy makers, students at all levels, and interested citizens.”  There will be a forthcoming event to celebrate Catherine’s contributions to open access.

Interested in demonstrating your personal commitment to open access?  Download these posters for your office or faculty area on Open Access Lingo Demystified, and Know Your Author Rights, or request a print copy from bcameron@ryerson.ca