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Sangeeta Bhadra

Sangeeta Bhadra studied biology at the University of Toronto and now lives in Brampton, Ontario.  Sam’s Pet Temper is her first book for children.

Fiction (Juvenile, Picture book)

The Nut That Fell from the Tree

Illustrated by France Cormier
Toronto: Kids Can Press, 2020.

Publisher’s Synopsis (From its website)

In the style of “The House That Jack Built,” here’s a cumulative, rhyming tale that follows an acorn on an arduous journey, as one animal after another steals it, drops it or tosses it, sending the acorn inside an old shoe, high above the trees and down to the bottom of a stream. But in the end, the rat, goose, bear and more turn out to simply be the conduits that help the acorn eventually land on a hillside, where the warm sun helps it grow into another grand oak tree, which now holds the house where Jack (Jill’s grandson) plays.

In this lively story, Sangeeta Bhadra offers a playful depiction of the circle of life. The jaunty rhythm of the text (“This is the raccoon, a sneak through and through / that tricked the goose with a bird’s-eye view . . .”) and the use of fun-to-say words — like, “hullabaloooo” and “pee-ew” — make for a picture book that begs to be read aloud. France Cormier’s richly colored illustrations add energy and continuity to the story, as the perspective zooms in and out and dotted lines follow the acorn’s path. This book could easily spark discussions about plant life cycles, animal habitats and food chains.

Fiction (Juvenile, Picture book)

Sam’s Pet Temper

Illustrated by Marion Arbona.
Toronto: Kids Can Press, 2014.

Publisher’s Synopsis (From its website)

The hero of this picture book, Sam, has to wait for everything on the playground one day, and this makes him mad. “He got madder and madder until he was the maddest he had ever been in his whole life.” And then, suddenly, an unusual thing appears. It runs around, shoving and tripping and pinching and stomping, until all the other children have run away. “It was hanging upside down from the monkey bars, grinning at him. Sam had never seen anything like it before, but he knew what it was. It was a Temper.” At first, having a pet Temper is fun. But before long, the Temper starts causing trouble for Sam. And eventually, Sam comes to the realization that his Temper is something he needs to learn to control.

Selected Criticism and Interpretation

Chilana, Rajwant Singh. “Sangeeta Bhadra.” In South Asian Writers in Canada: A Bio-Bibliographical Study. Surrey, BC: Asian Publications, 2017, 273.
Z1376 .S68 C45 2017

Links

Publisher Kids Can Press