Ramabai Espinet

Ramabai Espinet was born in Trinidad and Tobago in 1948. Since the 1970s she has divided her time between Canada and the Caribbean. Her Indo-Caribbean heritage figures prominently in much of her work. In addition to poetry and fiction, Espinet is an established essayist and critic. A graduate of York University, she also completed a Ph.D. in English at the University of the West Indies in St. Augustine, Trinidad. Her thesis examined the place of Euro-creole women writers, with particular reference to the work of Jean Rhys and Phyllis Shand Allfrey. Espinet teaches English and Caribbean Studies at York University and Seneca College in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Espinet’s performance pieces Beyond the Kalapani, and Indian Robber Talk both explore the historical record of South Asian immigration to the Caribbean.

Fiction (Juvenile, Picture book)

Ninja’s Carnival

Art by Farida Zamen.
Toronto: Sister Vision, 1993.

Fiction (Juvenile, Picture book)

The Princess of Spadina: A Tale of Toronto

Illustrated by Veronica Sullivan.
Toronto: Sister Vision, 1992.
9th floor PZ7 .E76 P75 1992

Publisher’s Synopsis

[This] is a wonderful tale of magic and adventure on the streets of Toronto. A real princess with dreadlocks and magical running shoes lives on the streets of Spadina, the Kensington Market is really an enchanted avenue, and three little girls of diverse heritage can be best friends, and can perform heroic exploits together. A fun-filled, action-packed, exciting experience for readers from 5-95!

Fiction

The Swinging Bridge

Toronto: HarperFlamingoCanada, 2003.
9th floor PS8559 .S68 S94 2003

Publisher’s Synopsis

The Swinging Bridge is a moving story of race and displacement, a story that carries us effortlessly from nineteenth-century India, with its cast-out Brahmin widows, to the cane fields of Trinidad, where impoverished Indians become indentured labourers, to the optimism of the twentieth century, when the island sheds its colonial past and reimagines itself as a new homeland for many cultures. But by the 1960s, racial politics and the promise of economic security draw Mona’s family to North America, where they discover a new continent with old problems.

Awards and Honours

2004 Commonwealth Book Prize–Best First Book (Caribbean and Canada Region)(Nominated)

Poetry

Nuclear Seasons: Poems

Toronto: Sister Vision Press, 1991.
9th floor PS8559 .S68 N8 1991

Publisher’s Synopsis

Ranging through these poems is a voice–Caribbean, Indian, rural, urban, unplaced, angry, lyrical–challenging conventional ways of seeing, raging against the winner-takes-all morality of power politics and engaging with the turbulence of war, hunger and imbalance: the voice of the unfed, still hungry, refusing to pay for the alligator shoes of the well-shod…

Anthology

Trinidad Noir

9th floor PR9272.8 .T74 2008

Espinet, Ramabai. “Nowarian Blues.” In Trinidad Noir, edited by Lisa Allen-Agostini & Jeanne Mason. New York: Akashic Books, 2008, 81-95.

Selected Criticism and Interpretation

 

Espinet, Ramabai. “An Interview with Ramabai Espinet.” Interview by Elaine Savory. In Writers of the Caribbean Diaspora: Shifting Homelands, Travelling Identities.  New Delhi: Sterling Publishers, 2008, 257-274.
9th floor PR9205 .W75 2008


Espinet, Ramabai. “Ramabai Espinet.” Interview by Kwame Dawes. In Talk Yuh Talk: Interviews with Anglophone Caribbean Poets.  Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2001, 108-123.
9th floor PR9205.2 .T35 2001


Hamilton, Njelle W.  “Sound Writing: Popular Music in the Contemporary Caribbean Novel.”  Ph.D. diss., Brandeis University, 2012.


Kandiuk, Mary. “Ramabai Espinet.” In Caribbean and South Asian Writers in Canada: A Bibliography of Their Works and of English-language Criticism.  Lanham: Scarecrow Press, 2007, 51-53.
9th floor PS8089.5 .C37 K36 2007


Khan, Aliyah R.  “”Calling the Magician”: The Metamorphic Indo-Caribbean.”  Ph.D. diss., University of California, Santa Cruz, 2012.
Available from Proquest Dissertations and Theses
Available as an open access dissertation from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/8p63v91p


Kuwabong, Dannabang. “Landscape and Diasporic Citizenzhip(s) in Ramabai Espinet’s The Swinging Bridge and Nuclear Seasons,” chap. in Confluences 2: Essays on the New Canadian Literature, ed. by Nurjehan Aziz. Toronto: Mawenzi House, 2017, pp. 31-46.
9th floor PS8117 .C66 2017


Mathur, Charu. “A Narrative of Self-Reclamation: Ramabai Espinet’s The Swinging Bridge”. In Literary Constructs of the Self: Socio-Cultural Contexts, ed. Santosh Gupta and Mini Nanda. Jaipur: Rawat Publications, 2010, 170-178.
9th floor PN56 .S46 L58 2010


McKeown, Judith Antoinette Jeannette.  “Si(gh)t[e]-ing and (Re)writing Home(lessness): African and Indian Caribbean Women En/gendering Multiple Migratory Identifications in Canada.”  M.A. diss., York University, 2005.
Available from Proquest Dissertations and Theses


Rahemtullah, Omme-Salma. “Interrogating “Indianness”: Identity and Diasporic Consciousness Among South Asian Twice Migrants in Canada.” M.A. diss., Ryerson University, 2007.
6th floor FC106 .S66 R34 2007
Electronic versions also available from the Ryerson Digital Commons and from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses


Ramabai Espinet: Coming Home

Produced and directed by Frances-Anne Solomon. 49. min. Leda Serene Films, 2005.
Audio-visual, 5th floor PS8559. S68 R36 2005


Sarbadhikary, Krishna. “Contesting Identities, Claiming Spaces: Ramabai Espinet.” In Surviving the Fracture: Writers of the Indo-Caribbean Diaspora.  New Delhi: Creative Books, 2007, 204-238.
9th floor PS8089.5 .S68 S37 2007


Waisvisz, Sarah Gabriella.  “Fugitive Rhythms: Re-imagining Diasporic Caribbean-Canadian Communities in Ramabai Espinet’s “The Swinging Bridge”, Tessa McWatt’s “Out of My Skin”, and Dionne Brand’s “What We All Long For”.”  M.A. diss., McGill University, 2006.
Available from Proquest Dissertations and Theses