First Edition Photobook Award, 2018 Award Winners

The Photography Studies program at Ryerson University together with Ryerson University Library & Archives is pleased to announce the 2018 recipients of the First Edition Photobook Award:

Book Award Recipients

After Grapefruit, Clea Christakos-Gee
Untitled, Raelene Giffin
In Nocte, Rafaela Conde
In the Water, Lisa McElroy
9869518588, Heather Rattray
Home and Glory, Kalen Huxhan
It’s Good Once You Get There, Hayley Wilsdon

Honourable mentions:

Surface Study, Shaw Quan
Less than 5%, Taya Hampartzoomian
In and of Itself, Lauren Armstrong
Come over sometimes and Other Messages Received and Sent, Leyla Godfrey

After Grapefruit, by Clea Christakos-Gee.

Untitled, by Raelene Giffin.

In Nocte, by Rafaele Conde.

Into the Water, by Lisa McElroy

9869518588, by Heather Rattray 

Home and Glory, by Kalen Huxhan.

It’s Good Once You Get There, by Hayley Wilsdon.

About the Award

As part of MPS507, a 3rd year Ryerson University Image Arts class in The Photographic Book, students conceive of, and create their own photobook. This is, in part, related to work that has been completed in the co-requisite class, MPS506 – Photographic Production. These are both required courses for the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Image Arts) Photography Studies Option. Each year, the Library purchases the top photobooks in the class from the creator, as judged by the Special Collections Librarian, Alison Skyrme, and a special invited guest panel (this year Professor Don Snyder, Instructor and Artist Robyn Cumming, and Assistant Professor Dr. Karla McManus). The books are judged at the First Edition Photobook Show – an exhibition of the photobooks at the end of the semester. For evaluation, particular attention is paid to design, sequencing, and integration of images and text. The library catalogues each book, and houses them in the Special Collections department, where they will be available for students and researchers. An exhibition will be held in November to highlight the 2018 winners.

History

The First Edition Photobook Award was established in 2015 by Image Arts instructor Christopher Manson and the Ryerson Library to honour 3rd-year photography students who have made exceptional achievements in photobook production. It provides an incentive for students to achieve the early recognition that will have a lasting legacy in the Library collection.

Previous Award Recipients

The following 2017 award winners were presented with a certificate during the Image Arts Awards Night, November 2017: Adrian Walton-Cordeiro, Ailene Devries, Fehn Foss, Julia Garnet, Feline Gerhardt, Warren Rynkun.

For more information contact: Alison Skyrme.

This years books, as well winners from past years, will be on display in the Hallway exhibition cabinets in front of Archives and Special Collections between November 19, 2019 and January 15, 2019.

2018 Panel

This year we were fortunate to have a judges panel that included Professor Don Snyder, Instructor Robyn Cumming, and Dr. Karla McManus.

Robyn Cumming is a Toronto-based artist and educator. Prior to Ryerson she taught at OCADU and in the Art and Art History Program at U of T/Sheridan. Her current work focuses on representation and accumulation with a recent emphasis on historical images gleaned from Ebay. Robyn was long listed for the 2014 Aimia Photography Prize and is represented by Erin Stump Projects in Toronto. She has a BFA (Honours) from Ryerson University and an MFA from York University.

Karla McManus is an art historian who specializes in the study of photography and the environmental imaginary. Her writing and research focuses on how historic and contemporary concerns, from wildlife conservation, to environmental disasters, to anxiety about the future, are visualized photographically. She received her PhD from Concordia University in 2015 and was a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow in Art History and Art Conservation at Queen’s University from 2015-2017.

Don Snyder has an extensive background in photographic history and curation. Before joining the Ryerson faculty, he held an appointment as Curator of Photography at the Addison Gallery of American Art, where he originated the museum’s photography exhibition program. At Ryerson, he established the Image Arts (IMA) Gallery at 80 Spadina Avenue, and was instrumental in the founding of Function, the School’s annual publication of student work, essays and interviews. He has taught in the York-Ryerson Communication and Culture program, and in Ryerson’s graduate programs in Photographic Preservation and Collections Management as well as the Documentary Media MFA program. Particular interests are critical directions in photography and documentary practice during the past decade.

 

 

Ryerson 7025 – Athletics and Intramurals

This year marks a special Anniversary at Ryerson University – a double anniversary. It has been 70 years since the founding of the school and 25 years since it achieved University status.

In conjunction with University wide celebrations, The Ryerson University and Archives has created an exhibit, running June 1 – October 31, looking back at the history of the school. For each month the exhibit is open we will feature in our blog one of the 5 themes of the exhibit: 5 pivotal moments in Ryerson’s history, Student Groups and Clubs, Student Government, Student Housing, and Athletics and Intramurals.

 

For October’s blog and the final installment in our special anniversary series we will look at Athletics and Intramurals – the spaces and the evolution of inter-university sport and intramurals between 1948 and 1993.

Athletic Spaces

The First Gymnasium

In 1950 Ryerson’s first gymnasium was located in a converted garage on Church Street. The space consisted of a spacious gymnasium with lockers and shower facilities, a social/common room, The Supply Store, a game room, a tuck shop, and a barber shop.

Ryerson’s first gymnasium (RG 95.1 Athletics CM51-6)

Kerr Hall Gymnasiums

In the 1964 2 new gymnasiums and a swimming pool opened in the brand new Howard Kerr Hall. The two gymnasiums could be utilized as 3 full sized basketball courts, 9 badminton courts, or 6 volleyball courts. The 23 metre swimming pool was built with 2 one-metre diving boards and a locker room.

Construction of Kerr Hall Pool, ca. 1962 (RG 95.1 Howard Kerr Hall)

Upper Gym in Kerr Hall, ca. 1963 (RG 95.1 Howard Kerr Hall)

Ryerson Athletic Centre

Opened in 1987, Ryerson’s unique underground Recreation and Athletics Centre provided 50,000 square feet of new facilities including 7 squash courts, two multipurpose gyms, a fitness training centre, a dance studio, a running track, and shower facilities. Built beneath the Kerr Hall Quadrangle, the two storey centre required a 30 foot excavation to accommodate it.

Construction of Ryerson Athletic Centre in Kerr Hall Quad, ca. 1985 (RG 395.40.06)

Construction of interior of the Ryerson Athletic Centre, ca. 1985 (RG 395.40.06)

Running track and court in Ryerson Athletic Centre, ca. 1985 (RG 395.40.06)

 

Running Track and court in the Ryerson Athletic Centre ca. 1988 (RG 395.40.06)

Atrium in Ryerson Athletic Centre ca. 1988 (RG 395.40.06)

Mattamy Athletic Centre

The Mattamy Athletic Centre, previously known as Maple Leaf Gardens, features a second floor fitness centre and a hardwood dance studio. Home of the Ryerson Rams basketball, volleyball, and hockey teams since 2012, the building also houses a full sized ice rink that can accommodate 2500 seated fans, team rooms, and Coca-Cola Court – a multipurpose gym court.

Eggy the Ram and Carleton the Bear in front of the future Mattamy Athletic Centre, formerly Maple Leaf Gardens (Ryerson Archives digital assets)

Puck drop by Prime Minister Stephen Harper at the official opening of the Mattamy Athletic Centre, 2012. Photographer: Clifton Li (Ryerson Archives Digital Assets)

Front cover of the 2012-2013 Ryerson Athletics year in review report (RG 30.116)

Athletics

The first sports teams organized at Ryerson in 1948 were men’s hockey, men’s basketball and co-ed swimming, and co-ed equestrian. The men’s hockey team was the first athletics group to compete wearing the blue, gold, and white uniform. In 1949 a women’s hockey team was established and played at Ravina Gardens in High Park.

Ryerson Football program – RIT vs RMC, Saturday October 20, 1962 (RG 30.27)

Women’s basketball team playing in the old gymnasium, ca. 1957 (RG 95.1 Basketball)

Men’s Basketball team on the court, ca. 1962. (RG 95.1 Basketball)

Ryerson Zebras men’s soccer team, ca. 1959 (RG 95.1 Soccer)

By 1993, Ryerson Athletics programs were much more developed. The teams competed nationally in the Canadian Inter-university Athletic Union in hockey, basketball, volleyball, soccer and swimming. Other Ryerson sports teams included badminton, fencing, squash, as well as men’s hockey and women’s figure skating.

Ryerson Athletics and Recreation brochure, ca. 1993 (RG 30.70)

Ryerson Inter-University Athletics annual report for 1993/1994 (RG 30.002.001)

Ryerson Rams Inter-University sports schedules. 1993-1994 (RG 30.002.001)

Intramurals

Intramural programs were designed with fun and creation in mind. There were no try-outs or skill requirements to join.

Because of a delay in the construction of Ryerson’s gymnasium on Church Street, the Athletics Association was not able to organize extensive intramural programs. By the Fall of 1951 intramural programs for basketball, badminton and volleyball were held in the gym, while hockey, swimming, riding, curling and skiing took place off campus.

Ryerson Riding Club at Whitewood Stables, ca. 1950 (RG 95.1 Clubs)

By 1993 over 3000 students participated in 40 different intramural programs. Leagues were divided into women’s, co-ed, and men’s groups and programs included aerobics, innertube water polo and line dancing.

Ryerson Intramurals fall schedule, 1995 (RG 30.16)

Snow Football intramural poster, 1995 (RG 30.16)

Innertube waterpolo intramural poster, 1995 (RG 30.16)

Co-ed Basketball intramural poster, 1995 (RG 30.16)

 

To learn more about Athletics and Intramurals at Ryerson – please visit the Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections located on the 4th floor of the library in Room LIB404.

 

Ryerson 7025 – Student Housing

This year marks a special Anniversary at Ryerson University – a double anniversary. It has been 70 years since the founding of the school and 25 years since it achieved University status.

In conjunction with University wide celebrations, The Ryerson University and Archives has created an exhibit, running June 1 – October 31, looking back at the history of the school. For each month the exhibit is open we will feature in our blog one of the 5 themes of the exhibit: 5 pivotal moments in Ryerson’s history, Student Groups and Clubs, Student Government, Student Housing, and Athletics and Intramurals.

This month marks the start of a new school year and for thousands of Ryerson students the first time living away from home. So it is fitting that for September’s blog we will look at student housing at Ryerson.

 

When Ryerson first opened in 1948, there was no campus housing for students. Students rented their own apartments, lived in rooming houses or in various YMCA or YWCA facilities. For the 1957-1958 school year Ryerson’s Students’ Adminstrative Council started a housing registry – to help students find accommodations in the city.

Ryerson Housing Registry, 1984

Church Street Annexes

In the late 1950s – early 1960s Ryerson purchased 323 and 333 Church Street for the purpose of providing housing to male students. Between 10 and 12 students lived in each building. After Kerr Hall residence opened in 1960, the students rooming in the Church Street residences were allowed to use Kerr Hall’s amenities.

 

323 Church Street (RG 95.1.13.03.01)

333 Church Street

 

Kerr Hall – Eric Palin Hall

Kerr Hall, renamed Eric Palin Hall in 1969, was Ryerson’s first residence. An all male dormitory that housed 42 students. Located in the refurbished Working Boys Home at 63 Gould Street (Now Oakham House). It opened in the Fall of 1960. In its first year running it cost students $10 per week to live there. It closed in 1972.

 

Oakham House/Palin Hall ca. 1964

Dorm room in Oakham House, 1960

Bond House – O’Keefe House

Bond House opened its doors as a men’s residence in 1964. Home to 33 students on 3 floors, it changed its name to O’Keefe House in 1978. It would eventually become a co-ed residence. O’Keefe House closed its doors at the end of the 2017-2018 school year.

Bond House/O’Keefe House

Neill-Wycik College

The Student Housing group of the Ryerson Students’ Administrative Council joined the Co-op College and applied for incorporation in 1967 under the name “Neill-Wycik” – Neill for A. S. Neill the founder of Summerhill School in the U. K. and Wycik in honour of Mama and Papa Wycik.

The co-operative ran 3 (all male and co-ed) houses in Toronto for Ryerson students. They were located at 707 Spadina Avenue, 310 Jarvis Street, and 325 Church Street. They also rented 2 floors in the Rochdale College co-operative building at 341 Bloor Street West starting in 1968.

325 Church Street (RG 95.1.13.03.01)

The purpose built Neill-Wycik College student residence building opened in November of 1970. It housed 800 students on 22 floors.

Neill-Wycik College (RG 122.10.094)

International Living/Learning Centre

Hotel Ibis, located at 240 Jarvis Street, was purchased by Ryerson Polytechnical Institute in August of 1993. The 11 storey building would be home to 270 co-ed students as well as the new home for the Hospitality and Tourism Management Program at Ryerson.

International Living/Learning Centre (RG 395.40.16)

Pitman Hall

Pitman Hall is located at 160 Mutual Street. It has 14 floors and 565 rooms – with each floor having communal kitchen, lounge, and laundry facilities. The cafeteria is located on the main floor. This residence is co-ed.

Pitman Hall (RG 395.40.16)

HOEM Residence

Opened in the Fall of 2018, Ryerson’s newest residence HOEM is Ryerson’s largest residence with 30 floors and 593 rooms. All suites are fully furnished and include a kitchen, living room, and single, private bedrooms. A co-ed residence that is open to both first and upper year students. HOEM was built and owned by Canadian Student Communities Inc. and is operated in partnership with Ryerson University. To learn more about HOEM, visit their web page here.

HOEM Student Residence was built and is owned by Canadian Student Communities Inc. It is operated in partnership with Ryerson University

To learn more about Ryerson’s history – please visit the Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections located on the 4th floor of the library in Room LIB404.

Stay tuned for month for the final blog in the series – Student Athletics and Intramurals.

Ryerson 7025 – Five Pivotal Moments in Ryerson’s History

This year marks a special Anniversary at Ryerson University – a double anniversary. It has been 70 years since the founding of the school and 25 years since it achieved University status.

In conjunction with University wide celebrations, The Ryerson University and Archives has created an exhibit, running June 1 – October 31, looking back at the history of the school. For each month the exhibit is open we will feature in our blog one of the 5 themes of the exhibit: 5 pivotal moments in Ryerson’s history, Student Groups and Clubs, Student Government, Student Housing, and Athletics and Intramurals.

For June’s blog – we will look at some key moments in the University’s history.

 

Five Pivotal Moments in Ryerson’s History

Moment #1 Open for Business

In August of 1948 the Ryerson Institute of Technology was founded “as an experiment in post-secondary education and an alternative to the traditional apprenticeship system”. With only two weeks to advertise – Ryerson opened in September of 1948 with an enrollment of 210 students, each paying just $25 tuition.

 

Advertisement on page 13 of the August 11, 1948 edition of the Kitchener-Waterloo Record newspaper.

 

Moment #2 RIT to RPI

On April  26, 1963 “An Act Respecting Ryerson Polytechnical Institute” was formally declared by the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. Along with the change it name from Ryerson Institute of Technology to Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, the school became independent of the various governmental bodies that controlled it and would now be regulated by a Board of Governors.

 

Front page of the March 16, 1963 edition of The Ryersonian, the Ryerson student newspaper.

 

Moment #3 A Question of Degrees

In 1971 Bill 97 was passed in the Ontario Legislature enabling Ryerson Polytechnical Institute the ability to grant degrees. The first 9 degrees, in Interior Design, Business Management, and Geodetic Sciences, were handed out at the May 26, 1972 convocation ceremony. Ontario Premier Bill Davis received an “honourary” Bachelor of Technology in Public Administration at the ceremony.

 

Photograph of 7 of the 9 first Ryerson students to receive degrees. Premier William Davis is seated second from right. (RG 4.96, Photographer: Jerry Davey)

 

Moment #4 RPI to RPU

On May 27, 1991 the Ryerson Board of Governors and Academic Council (Senate) gave their support to the proposal the the school seek full university status. Two years later on June 1, 1993 the dream was realized when Ryerson Polytechnic University was recognized by Royal Assent.

 

Ryerson President Terry Grier celebrating University status. (RG 76.14.723)

 

Moment #5 RPU to RU

In 2000, seven years after achieving university status, Ryerson opts to change its name to Ryerson University – with its formal name remaining Ryerson Polytechnical University. Two years later on June 27, 2002 the name is formally recognized by the government and changed to Ryerson University.

 

Signage outside of the Ryerson University bookstore and parking garage. (Archives Digital Content)

There are many more pivotal and significant moments throughout our 70 year history – so many that they would not all fit in this blog, but if you would like to learn more about them – please visit the Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections located on the 4th floor of the library in Room LIB404. You can also take a look at the University’s anniversary page here.

Stay tuned for next month’s entry when we look at student clubs and groups.

2017 Year in Review: Films in the Collection

Happy 2018!

As we begin a new year and semester at Ryerson, I would like to share highlights from the collections by looking at films I inspected in 2017. I started working at Archives & Special Collections in July 2017 as an Audiovisual Assistant with the goal to survey their moving image assets for preservation and digitization initiatives. It has been an incredible experience digging through the vault, and I would like to share some of my discoveries by using the reference images I took while inspecting the films.

 

What’s an Expert? (1976).

 

The Archives have several promotional films that examine the history of Ryerson and the programs offered since the university’s inception. What’s an Expert explores the Secretarial Science program, which was available at Ryerson between 1952 and 1985.

 

 

 

Ryerson Is (1970).

 

 

Ryerson Is, another promotional title, presents brief vignettes on Ryerson’s  academic programs.

 

 

Nana Mouskouri in Belafonte at the O’Keefe (1965).

Opening title for the CBC special featuring Duke Ellington. The show was produced and directed by Sampson (1964).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I found several hidden gems as part of the Paddy Sampson Fonds in Special Collections. The films in this collection include raw and edited footage from musical television programs that Sampson produced for the CBC in the 1960s and 1970s. One of my favorites is Belafonte at the O’Keefe, a show featuring Harry Belafonte accompanied by the Greek singer Nana Mouskouri and the Folk-blues duo Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee.

 

 

Shot from the Buffy Ste-Marie CBC Special (1980).

 

 

 

The collection also holds a Duke Ellington variety special with a beautiful animated introduction, as well as raw footage from a television program on Buffy Ste-Marie.

Kraft Miracle Whip advertisement from the Sampson films.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of my favorite parts of the Sampson films is that we have kinescope copies (black and white film recordings of television broadcasts) since these reels include the advertisement breaks during the shows!

 

 

 

Ryerson Media Centre staff film (1972).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recently, I have been looking into Ryerson’s past, and learning about the Ryerson Media Centre (now called the Digital Media Projects) through films they produced in the 1970s. An untitled reel featured media and radio staff members showing off their equipment and facilities.

 

 

 

Ryerson Media Centre staff film (1972).

Ryerson Media Centre staff film (1972).

 

The Film/Paper Story by the Eastman Kodak Company (1980).

 

 

 

The Kodak Canada Corporate Archive and Heritage Collection has several great instructional films, including one on the process of making photographic paper and film stocks.

Opening of a film by the Eastman Kodak Company (1980).

Ryerson Media Centre film on the construction of the new library resource centre (1971)

 

 

 

 

Our biggest milestone for 2017: A&SC moved into a new space on the 4th floor of the library!

Stop by to visit the reading room and learn more about films in the collection! We even have a 16 mm circulating film collection for  faculty and instructor use.

See you in the new year!

 

 

 

New Exhibition: Projecting Magic

Have you ever wondered what people watched at home and in theaters before Netflix and the invention of cinema? This exhibition hopes to demystify one aspect of pre-cinematic technology: magic lantern projectors. These early optical devices used oil or gas light sources to project glass slide images onto a screen. Some say magic lanterns are the precursors to Powerpoint presentations!

The first report of the construction of a magic lantern is generally considered to be referring to the Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens in 1659. It was inspired by precedent optical inventions such as the camera obscura (which was a room containing a pinhole that a scene was projected through onto the opposite wall), and magic shadow shows which used puppets and hands to recount stories.

Lampascope Boule magic lantern, meant to be placed above an oil lamp.

By the eighteenth-century, the magic lantern was “openly displayed” for public events by traveling lanternists in public venues. Several showmen used the lanterns to produce horror shows, popularly known as “Phantasmagoria” shows. These presentations projected ghostly images onto smoke screens to create the effect of conjuring evil spirits.

Initially lanterns were illuminated by candlelight or oil lamps, but this did not produce enough light to project a clear image from afar. Lanternists began to use limestone in the early 1800s, as they could successfully be used for projection in large theaters. Limelight is produced through the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen directed at a piece of lime (calcium oxide). This method was quite complex and potentially hazardous, since at the time putting gas under pressure was achieved by sandwiching rubber bags filled with gas between two pieces of wood.

Magic lantern slides by the German manufacturer Ernest Plank, with the trademark initials E.P.

By the mid 1800s, a huge variety of magic lanterns became available to the professional and home market. On display in the exhibit, we have lanterns with varying functions, from a decorative circular lantern meant to be placed above an oil lamp at home, to a large biunial (or double lens) lantern that could be used in large halls for theatrical presentation or educational lectures.

Slides also varied in their typology, becoming more detailed and elaborate with each new iteration. Initially they were rectangular strips of glass with hand painted imagery and a mahogany wood border. When separate wooden slide carriers were developed, the wooden border attached to the wood slides themselves was removed from the design. Then, the illustrations featured on the glass portion went from being hand-painted to mechanically produced, and by the mid 1800s photographic slides came into production as well.

Astronomical mechanical slides were designed to specifically demonstrate movements of the solar system.

Magic lantern projection also demonstrates the aspiration to present not only static, but moving images to an audience. Lanternists would use panoramic slides, which when passed in front of the projector’s lens would create the illusion of movement. This quickly progressed into animated images which came about with creation of ingenious mechanical slides. This included rack-and-pinion slides where glass discs were rotated using a handle (and which were often astrologically themed), lever slides, or single pulley slides which used a rope pulley system.

Items on display are part of a recent donation of magic lantern projectors and slides from John Tysall. Stop by the Archives and Special Collections Department on the 4th floor of the Ryerson Library to see the new exhibit located in the display case by the 4th floor reading room doors. The exhibition is designed and curated by Jocelyn Oprzedek and Olivia Wong.

 

 

 

 

 

A Window in Time – 1899

What is that date on the window?

The Archives and Special Collections (A&SC) windows feature a series of seemingly random numbers worked into the window’s graphic pattern. The numbers are actually dates, chosen by ASC staff, that are significant to the City of Toronto, Ryerson University, and Archives and Special Collections. Over the course of the next year our blog will feature some of the window dates and explain their significance.

1899

2005.001.3.259. Canadian Kodak Co., Ltd. Headquarters (1899-1901), 41 Colborne Street, Toronto

In 1899, after successfully operating on the American market for over a decade, George Eastman dispatched Kodak employee John G. Palmer to Toronto to determine the viability of establishing a subsidiary in Canada. Palmer discovered a robust market for photographic products and, on November 8, 1899, Canadian Kodak Co., Limited was incorporated under the Ontario Company’s act. The nascent company established headquarters in downtown Toronto, embarking on a relationship with the city that would last more than a century and would constitute the heart of the company’s manufacturing operations in Canada.

For more information on Kodak Canada, please visit https://library.ryerson.ca/asc/2015/01/kodak-in-toronto-1899-2005-a-century-of-traces/

 

New Exhibition: Canada 150, Picturing the Canadian Landscape

Canada 150: Picturing the Canadian Landscape. Ryerson Library Archives and Special Collections

The plains of the prairies, the forests of the interior, and the seascapes of the Atlantic and the Pacific have served as muses for Canadian artists and writers for centuries.

In Canada 150: Picturing the Canadian Landscape, photographs and ephemera of the Lorne Shields Historical Photograph Collection at Ryerson University showcase the ways in which the natural landscape has been an essential part of the identity and history of Canada.

Incorporating extraordinary cameras from the Heritage Camera Collection and the Kodak Canada Corporate Archives and Heritage Collection, and rare books from Ryerson University’s Special Collections, this exhibition reflects on the photographic, recreational, and artistic responses to Canada’s natural landscape by artists, enthusiasts and writers throughout the years.

Drop by the Archives and Special Collections Department, on the  4th floor of the Ryerson Library, to see the exhibition, curated by Image Arts students Bowie Fan, Gabriele Tai, Georgia Love, Justine Marasigan, and Lodoe Laura.

The 2017 First Edition Book Award Winners

Winners of the 2017 First Edition Book Award

Award Recipients

Adrian Walton-Cordeiro – Contesse De Bertren
Ailene Devries – Two Cities and a River
Fehn Foss – Remembering, Faring
Julia Garnet – Elements
Feline Gerhardt – About Mankind and the Attempt to Increase Significance
Warren Rynkun – The Yard

Honourable Mentions

Grayson Alabiso-Cahil – We’re not the first, and we won’t be the last
Rena Balmain-Matthews – Poems
Jana Beaton – Wallpaper Floorboards
April Beatson – Skate
Rebecca Bentolila and Natasha Serio – Yours and Mine

About the Award

As part of MPS507, a 3rd year Ryerson University Image Arts class in The Photographic Book, students are expected to conceive of and create their own photobook. This is, in part, related to work that has been completed in the co-requisite class, MPS506 – Photographic Production. These are both required courses for the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Image Arts) Photography Studies Option. Each year, the Library purchases the top photobooks in the class, as judged by the Special Collections Librarian, Alison Skyrme, and a special invited guest (this year Robyn York of Anchorless Press). The library pays fair market value for each book, and commits to spending a maximum of $1000 per semester. The books are judged at the First Edition Photobook Show – an exhibition of the photobooks at the end of the semester. For evaluation, particular attention is paid to design, sequencing, and integration of images and text. The library catalogues each book, including a note about the award, and houses the books in Special Collections. Occasional exhibits are created to showcase the works.

History

The First Edition Photobook Award was established in 2015 by Image Arts instructor Christopher Manson and the Ryerson Library to honour 3rd year photography students who have made exceptional achievements in photobook production. It provides incentive for them to achieve early recognition that will have a lasting legacy in our collection.

Previous Award Recipients

The following 2016 award winners were presented with a certificate during the Image Arts Awards Night, November 19th, 2016: Andrea Chartrand, Kaya Kelley, Mina Markovic, Terence Reeves, Gabriel Steele, Alia Youssef.

2017 Award Winners

Warren Rynkun – The Yard (inside spread)

Fehn Foss – Remembering, Faring

 

 

Fehn Foss – Remembering, Faring

 

 

Julia Garnet – Elements

Ailene Devries – Two Cities and a River

Adrian Walton-Cordeiro: Contesse De Bertren

Feline Gerhardt – About Mankind and the Attempt to Increase Significance

Feline Gerhardt – About Mankind and the Attempt to Increase Significance (inside spread)

Guest Judge

Robyn York - Anchorless Press

Robyn York – Anchorless Press

Robyn York is a photographer and book artist whose work explores collecting, memory loss, and impermanence of place.She runs Anchorless Press, an independent publishing company that works with emerging artists to publish photo-based artists’ books, and has self-published and assisted in the design and production of over a dozen artists’ books and novels.

The New Archives and Special Collections Reading Room is Open for Business!

Now open to all students, staff, faculty!

The new Archives and Special Collections reading room is now open for business. We are now located on the 4th floor of the Library in LIB 404, adjacent to the new quiet study and teaching room, LIB405. The Archives and Special Collections reading room is open from Monday – Friday form 9-5.
Artifacts and exhibits are still being installed, but we are open for visitors and researchers. Here are a few photographs of our new digs.

New Quiet Study Area:

A large quiet study area, LIB405, is now open as well, and is available during library opening hours, but will occasionally be closed for booked classes. Signage will be posted indicating scheduled bookings.

For Instructors and Faculty: Teaching With Archival and Special Collections Material

If you are a teaching a class that might benefit from including primary source material, the quiet study/teaching space can be booked for classes. The archives and special collections staff can work with you to select books, photographs, documents, artifacts or other primary source materials from our collections. More information on our collection can be found on our website, and you can search for material on our online database. For more information, or to book a class, please email the Archives: archives@ryerson.ca or Special Collections: specialcollections@ryerson.ca.

Window into A&SC reading room

At the front desk, Daisy and RISIS are waiting to welcome you.

One of our “new” reading room tables, actually used by in a Ryerson Board Room in the 1970’s.

The reading room research materials are now all handily in one spot.

One of the most exciting changes for A&SC staff is the new mobile shelving for the collections. Not only did it double our storage capacity, it is also totally separate from the reading room and offices.

The A&SC staff encourage you to stop by and visit if you get the chance.