A Window in Time – 1899

What is that date on the window?

The Archives and Special Collections (A&SC) windows feature a series of seemingly random numbers worked into the window’s graphic pattern. The numbers are actually dates, chosen by ASC staff, that are significant to the City of Toronto, Ryerson University, and Archives and Special Collections. Over the course of the next year our blog will feature some of the window dates and explain their significance.

1899

2005.001.3.259. Canadian Kodak Co., Ltd. Headquarters (1899-1901), 41 Colborne Street, Toronto

In 1899, after successfully operating on the American market for over a decade, George Eastman dispatched Kodak employee John G. Palmer to Toronto to determine the viability of establishing a subsidiary in Canada. Palmer discovered a robust market for photographic products and, on November 8, 1899, Canadian Kodak Co., Limited was incorporated under the Ontario Company’s act. The nascent company established headquarters in downtown Toronto, embarking on a relationship with the city that would last more than a century and would constitute the heart of the company’s manufacturing operations in Canada.

For more information on Kodak Canada, please visit https://library.ryerson.ca/asc/2015/01/kodak-in-toronto-1899-2005-a-century-of-traces/

 

Practical Nursing – nursing notes from The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association fonds

The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association fonds came to the Ryerson Archives and Special Collections in 2011. In it are several notebooks filled with course notes, and practical knowledge for the student nurse.

One of the notebooks dates to the 1920’s and belonged to Wellesley School of Nursing class of 1925 graduate Elsie Kathleen Jones. Elsie K. returned to The Wellesley in 1928 and became the Director of Nursing in 1937, the role she held until her retirement in 1964.

Elsie K. Jones student notebook (RG 946.03.12.02)

In the notebook there are notations regarding everything from making a proper hospital bed and caring for the sheets, to recognizing and treating a hemorrhage in a patient. The following are some excerpts from the notebook.

“To Make a Closed bed”

To Make a Closed Bed

  • Loosen all the covers, removing one article at a time. Fold and place on a chair
  • Brush mattress well and turn from end to end
  • Place mattress protector on mattress
  • Put on lower sheet, wide hem at top, tucking in nine (9”) at top of mattress drawing tightly and turning straight corners.
  • Place the draw rubber, pulling on tightly, so there are no wrinkles
  • Place draw sheet, folding about 1/3 under at the top and tucking in tightly on each side
  • Place top sheet with the hem wrong side up, first coming to top of bed. Tuck in at the foot and make straight corners
  • Place blanket about 9” from top of the bed. Tuck in at the foot and make straight corners.
  • Then fold top sheet over the blanket and tuck in on both sides
  • Place the spread, reaching to the top of the bed, making straight corner at the bottom.
  • Place two pillows in bed. See that the pillows are well on the corners of the slips. Fold and place with closed end toward the door

The notebook also included instructions on how to make an “Ether” or surgical bed. The following are instructions for making up a surgical tray:

“Surgical dressing tray”

Surgical dressing tray

  1. Six packages of absorbent wipes
  2. Two large and two small dressings
  3. One package of sterile towels
  4. Set of instruments (forceps, scissors, probe)
  5. Adhesive straps
  6. Adhesive tape
  7. Antiseptic powder (Borace or Bismuth Formic Iodide)
  8. Bandages 2” x 3”
  9. Bandage scissors
  10. Curved basin
  11. Sterile doctor’s gloves
  12. Sterile bowl or basin of warm boracic solution
  13. Packing

The nurses were also responsible to pre-treating the bedding if stained before sending them out to be washed:

“Removing stains from bedding”

Removing Stains

Blood stains are soaked in cold water, then washed with soap and tepid water. For tea, coffee, and fruit stains use boiling water. If stains are still very persistent, use a solution of oxalic acid and rinse well afterwards in cold water.

Cocoa or anything containing milk use cold water

Grease stains, use hot water and soap or benzene

Iron Rust – spread over boiling water cover with salt and lemon juice, place in sun, if possible, and rinse thoroughly before sending to laundry

Ink stains – cover with salt and lemon juice and rinse thoroughly

Iodine – use ammonia or alcohol

When it came to treating their patients there were basic instructions such as recognizing sings of and type of fevers and proper care of thermometers:

“Types of Fever and care of thermometer”

 

Care of thermometer

Keep thermometer in bichloride of mercury solution 1-1000. Wash in cold water and dry before giving to patient

Types of Fever

  • Continuous fever which remains high with slight variations
  • Remittent, which remain above normal with considerable variations between highest and lowest temperature
  • Intermittent – alternately rises to high fever and falls to or below normal

The notebook also has a number of recipes for poultices, enemas, purgatives, and various medical solutions used by nurses to treat a variety of medical conditions. The Linseed poultice was used for treating chest congestion and pneumonia:

“Linseed poultice”

Linseed Poultice

Is made from linseed or ground flax seed meal. It is most effectual because it can be used at higher temperatures with blistering, as the linseed contains considerable oil.

Preparation

For a small poultice, use about 2/3 cup of linseed to 1 cup boiling water. Add the linseed slowly to the boiling water, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon or spatula. Turn the gas low and just let come to a boil. Remove from gas and beat vigorously. Spread the linseed about 3/4” thick on poultice gauze leaving a good margin for folding in. Carry to the patient between heated plates. Have ready oiled muslin flannel protector binder and pins

*Note – Linseed poultice must be hot, light and smooth.

To view the notebook in its entirety or look through other items in this fonds – please contact the Ryerson Archives at archives@ryerson.ca.

 

 

 

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS IS ON THE MOVE!

Doozer construction

Doozer construction sign from the Bob Hackborn fonds 2012.005.06.59

Beginning Monday May 16 Special Collections will be rooming with the Ryerson University Archives while renovations happen on the 4th floor. The Archives is located on the 3rd floor in the Library in room LIB387.

The move will take several weeks to complete, but we will continue to offer reference and research appointments while the shifting takes place.

To access Special Collections please email specialcollections@ryerson.ca for an appointment.

Empty shelving in Special Collections

Fitting, Kodak was Special Collections first fonds and it is the first to relocate to the third floor.

Empty shelving in Special Collections.

Clearing and disassembling of shelves has begun.

Fans of shelves against wall.

Shelves waiting for assemble in the Archives

Kodak ledgers on shelving in Archives

Kodak advertising ledgers in their home

Archival boxes on shelves in Archives.

Doesn’t take long to fill up the shelves.

We are looking forward to an exciting Summer and Fall with A&SC finally located in one place! Check back here for move updates and photographs.

 

Special Collections: Celebrating 10 Years

Untitled-22015 marked the 10 year anniversary of Special Collections at the Ryerson University Library and Archives. It seems like a good time time to have a look back at where we came from, and where we are headed.

The Special  Collections department at the Ryerson University Library was founded in 2005, with the acquisition of the Kodak Canada Corporate Archives and Heritage Collection after the Mount Dennis campus shut down. The collection includes the history of the company in Toronto since it’s arrival in 1900, and the contents of Kodak Museum that had recently opened at the Mount Dennis campus.Kodak Canada Heritage Collection

Small room with shelves of archival boxes, tables of albums and a computer workstation.

7th floor Special Collections

At that time, Special Collections occupied a small storage space on the 7th floor of the library, big enough for the two PPCM students working on the collection, but with no public research space.

By 2006, we’d moved to a larger space, and our collections had grown to include book collections, acquiring the Michael Mitchell collection and the Nicholas and Marilyn Graver collections. Students were able to visit the collection, and internships were created to process the large collections.

Graver

 

Office with many shelves containing albums, books and archival boxes. People moving boxes on carts.

2006: Moving in, a new space for Special Collections

Though safe and secure, the new space was difficult to access by researchers. This was solved in 2008, when a more permanent, accessible space was completed on the 4th floor of the library. The new  space featured more storage, exhibition and display space, as well as a research area and student work station. A modest exhibition program was instituted, and researchers gained an accessible reading room to explore the growing collections. These included the Leniniana propaganda collection, the Lorne Shields Historical Photography Collection. We also integrated the library’s existing rare book collection, and the acquisition of the Canadian Architect Magazine collection was underway.

LenincanadianArchitectToronto

Research Area in Special Collections at the Ryerson Library

The current research area in Special Collections at the Ryerson Library

 

 

The future of Special Collections at Ryerson looks bright and includes an expansion of our space, and integrating with the Archives department, which will allow more accessibility to our researchers and more space for our collections. We will continue to grow our collection, in line with our revised mandate to support teaching and research at Ryerson University.

Help us celebrate! Drop by to see a small selection of items from our most popular collections, now on display on the 4th floor of the Ryerson Library. For more information or to view the collections call or email to make an appointment.

Location: 4th Floor, Ryerson Library, LIB404
Hours: Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm

Phone: 416-979-5000 ext. 7027
Email: specialcollections@ryerson.caDesignArchivesSM

Points of Interest from the Collections – The Creation of the Archives

For the month of August, Archives and Special Collections will blog bi-weekly with points of interest from our collections.

This week we look at documents connected to the birth of the Archives at Ryerson.

In 1970 Ryerson Polytechnical Institute invited Professor D. McCormack Smyth to conduct a study of the structure of government at Ryerson.  The Smyth Commission Report was published and its 7th recommendation was the creation of an institutional Archives.

Page from report stating that an Archives be established to preserve historical documents.

Recommendation No. 7 – Smyth Commission report

On November 11, 1970 Ryerson President Donald Mordell sent out the following memo to all Deans, Chairmen, and Department heads.

Page 1 of the memo from Donald Mordell. Outlines what materials should be kept and asking people not to throw anything away until a system was in place to sort through the items to determine whether or not they were Archival.

Page 1 – November 11, 1970 memorandum

Page 2 of Mordell memo - Library will be storing the potential Archival material until a proper system is in place. He asks people to properly mark the materials.

Page 2 – November 11, 1970 memorandum

 

On November 17, 1970 Mordell sent the following memo to Jim Peters, a professor in the Department of English:

Donald Mordell memo to Jim Peters - thanking him for his suggestions and asking him if he would be interested in taking the position of Archivist.

Memo from Donald Mordell to Jim Peters

The Archives was officially established in 1971 as a special new department associated with the Library. Jim Peters was appointed Ryerson’s first Archivist.

Technikos magazine article announcing the establishment of Ryerson's Archives within the Library with Jim Peters as the Archivist.

Technikos magazine, Spring 1971

To learn more about the Archives and see what we have in our collections drop by. The Archives are open Monday – Friday from 9:00am t0 4:00pm.

The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing celebrates its centennial!

Although the Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing graduated its last class in 1975 when it officially became part of Ryerson’s School of Nursing, we celebrate its history and spirit – kept alive by its active and dedicated Alumnae Association – on what would have been its 100th anniversary year.

The school opened in 1912, with the official opening of the Hospital, It graduated its first class of 10 nurses in 1915, and its last class of 71 nurses in 1975.  In between it graduated 2083 nurses. Its Alumnae Association was created in 1915 and is still active today.  In 2011 The Association donated its collections of papers and artifacts to the Ryerson University Archives (see earlier blog post Wellesley Alumnae donation )

To celebrate Wellesley’s centennial, the Ryerson Archives has created an exhibit and slide show. Both will be available for viewing in the Archives until the end of September.  The Archives will be open for Alumni weekend on Saturday September 22. Contact us at (416) 979 5000 ext. 7027 to find out opening times for that day. Please enjoy the images included below – some are from the exhibit itself, and others are taken from the collection.

1972 Open House poster

E. K. Jones portrait, Director of Nursing and head of the Nursing school, 1937-1964

Portrait and uniforms in Archives window

Florence Nightingale letter and portrait

Exhibit in Archives reading room

Display case featuring items from The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Collection

Elizabeth Flaws portrait, Director of Nursing 1912-1926

Homewood – Original Wellesley Hospital building.

Nursing uniform and cape, Toronto General Hospital – Wellesley Division 1948-1959

Graduation cap, Wellesley Nursing cape, and Wellesley graduation doll in 1968 uniform

The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing graduation pin

Are you a Wellesley grad?  Was someone in your family a Wellesley girl? You can now email The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association at: thewellesleyschoolnsgtoronto@gmail.com

Archives & Special Collections database now online

The Archives & Special Collections staff are pleased to announce the ASC collections database is now online and publicly searchable. Anyone can look up key information about collections before visiting the reading rooms, or browse digital images online. Try it out today!

From our homepage, the “search database” picture takes you to a basic keyword search page (pictured above). Here you can look for information about entire collections or individual items. Use the “*” as a wildcard to shorten words, or use boolean search terms like “and”, “not”, and “or” to limit the records searched. If you don’t return any results, please feel free to ask one of the ASC staff members for help. We are still working on putting all of our records online so there may be some records that are more easily retrieved in person.

If your search is successful, the search results will be sorted to help you choose between the different types of records in our collections, and there are examples on the search results page if you need a little clarification.

Advanced search options are useful if you’re looking for something specific like a digital image, or a person who may have donated records. Again the search options are sorted: you can choose to search within whole collections, look only for individual files and items, or find person records. All of these records are linked together so you can start anywhere and wind up in another kind of record entirely.

Is this search helpful and easy-to-use? Have a comment or a question you’d like to share? Feel free to post here or send an email to specialcollections@ryerson.ca.

Celebrating Eggy

Sixty years ago Ryerson’s men’s varsity teams were called the Ryerson Rams. Why the ram? One theory is the school’s namesake, Egerton Ryerson, was born on March 24, 1803 – the ram in the zodiac.  Aries the ram is described as an extrovert with energy, assertiveness, a competitive nature and while courageous, impulsive and stubborn.

We all know our beloved Eggy.  We see him at school events. Not so long ago, in the near-distant past of 1961, Eggy had a, shall we say, realistic look.  Four students from the Student Administrative Council, wanting to boost school morale, acquired a ram for a reported $25 from the Toronto Stockyards.  The little ram, decorated with Ryerson pendants and ribbons made his grand debut at a Varsity Arena hockey game with Waterloo University.  Ryerson subsequently won the game, the little ram became a hero, and the rest is history.

Eggy I‘s debut at hockey game with University of Waterloo, Varsity Arena / Ryersonian, RG 95-1, Hockey, 1960/61

Then, as today, Eggy attended celebrations, sporting, and parade and picnic events.

Eggy I in his finery / Ryersonian, RG 95-1, Eggy, 1960/61

Eggy I oversees the band at a football game / Ryersonian, RG 95-1, Football, 1961/62

Eggy II attends Convocation, ca. 1962-1968 / Photographer: Roy Nichols, Cliipping file Eggy

Eggy III helping with 1970 Shinerama fund raising / Ryersonian, RG 95.6.24.45

There were a total of five real ram mascots between 1961 and 1991.  Eggy I lived on campus during the school year in a pen and shelter behind Oakham House (then called Kerr Hall) and spent the summer on a farm outside the city.  Eggy II did the same until the mid 1960s.  From that time, Eggy II through V lived on a farm year long and was transported to campus for events.

Living on campus, Eggy II with his caretaker “Poppa” Wycik and his companion dog Lucky / Toronto Telegram, 24 April 1964 / with permission from York University Libraries, Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections, Toronto Telegram fonds, ASC07139

Eggy II’s chariot / Ryersonian, February 22, 1963, Clipping file Eggy

Eggy III was known to be a little ornery, charging bales of hay, fence posts, his handler, and just about anything in front of him.

Eggy III, 1975 / Ryersonian, November 13, 1974

Eggy III reviewing frosh contestants / Photo: Brenda Lee Allan, Ryersonian, October 17, 1970, Clipping File Eggy

Eggy IV is reported to have been gentle and willing to pose for photos.

Eggy IV debuts on campus in luxury / Photo: Fred Lum, Eyeopener, February 4, 1982

Eggy IV had very curly horns / Ryersonian, September 11, 1987

Eggy V was the last live mascot.  He died in 1991.  The Human Society pressured universities using live animals as mascots to stop the practice due to cruelty.

While the real Eggy was still making appearances, Athletics and Recreation had a costumed Eggy from about the 1980s.  Possibly the first costumed Eggy – we’ll call him Costumed Eggy 1 – had a triangular nose and had developed floppy horns.

Eggy with his floppy horns gets his send off, as seen in this strange double image / Photographer: Bogdan Hoshowsky, Ryersonian, March 1, 1989

This variety of Eggy is a little frightful / Eyeopener, September 10, 1997

1989 – 1997 : An Eggy to be proud of – Costumed Eggy 2 – Note his
heart-shaped nose with hoofed hands and feet.

Eggy pumps hand weights in front of the RAC entrance, 1989 / RG 76.14.576

1997 – 2004 : Costumed Eggy 3 had an upward sweeping, sharp-
cornered nose with hoof hands and running shoes.

Eggy helps at the Community Barbecue with then Chancellor, John-Craig Eaton, 1999 / Forum, October 1999, RG 395.38.126

2004 – 2011 : Costumed Eggy 4 had a distinctive nose outlined in
grey/silver and flatter sitting horns.

At the basketball court / Photographer: Don McHoull, Eyeopener, February 11, 2004

2011 – present : Costumed Eggy 5 – This academic year started with
a new look – a trimmer, fitter Eggy with two faces:
his mean face and his party face.

He’s muscular and mean / Courtesy of Athletics and Sports, RAM 4879 (cropped)

Party-face Eggy shows off his dexterity by holding a cup of coffee. / Courtesy of Athletics & Recreation, RAM 4378-1

To learn more about Eggy and other Ryerson history facts, visit the Ryerson Archives, 3rd floor of the Library, Monday to Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  And visit our new Archives and Special Collections website.
http://www.ryerson.ca/archives/

Feature from the Collection: The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing

The Archives latest acquisition is The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing collection.  Donated by their Alumnae Association, this collection includes such wonderful items as a scrapbook from World War II, photographs of almost every graduating class, uniforms and a beautiful silver tea set.

On the left is Linda Cooper Wellesley ’68 – Associate Director, Collaborative Degree Program Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing and on the right is Shirley Heard Wellesley ’62 – Alumnae Association President. Also in the picture is a small part of the collection now housed in the Ryerson University Archives. Photo courtesy of University Advancement.

The Wellesley Hospital officially opened on August 27, 1912 – with the Nursing School starting the same year.  The first class of graduates left the school in 1915.

Wellesley Hospital Class 1915

The School graduated its last class in 1975.  Two years previous, the Ontario government mandated that nursing schools be taken out of the Hospitals and placed into Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology.  The Wellesley school was moved to Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, along with the school’s from Sick Kid’s Hospital and Women’s College Hospital, and amalgamated with Ryerson’s School of Nursing.

The following are some photographs of items in the collection. Stay tuned for further blog posts on The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing collection as we come closer to their 100th Anniversary in August of 2012.

Two Examples of Nursing Uniforms. Uniform on left was worn from 1949 – 1959 when Wellesley Hospital joined with Toronto General Hospital. The uniform on the right was worn from 1960-1968, after the Wellesley became an independent Hospital once more. Photo courtesy of University Advancement.

Nursing Cape. Photo courtesy of University Advancement.

Scrapbooks from the collection. Photo courtesy of University Advancement.