CLOSING December 9th – Archives and Special Collections is on the move!

Move time is  almost here and the staff here in Archives and Special Collections could not be more excited.

Please note – Archives and Special Collections will be closing at end of day Friday December 9th, 2016 and re-opening Monday January 16th, 2017.

We ask during this time, if you need to contact the Archives or Special Collections to please use email: archives@ryerson.ca and specialcollections@ryerson.ca as our telephones will be in flux during the move.

See you in the new year in our beautiful new space.

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS IS ON THE MOVE!

Doozer construction

Doozer construction sign from the Bob Hackborn fonds 2012.005.06.59

Beginning Monday May 16 Special Collections will be rooming with the Ryerson University Archives while renovations happen on the 4th floor. The Archives is located on the 3rd floor in the Library in room LIB387.

The move will take several weeks to complete, but we will continue to offer reference and research appointments while the shifting takes place.

To access Special Collections please email specialcollections@ryerson.ca for an appointment.

Empty shelving in Special Collections

Fitting, Kodak was Special Collections first fonds and it is the first to relocate to the third floor.

Empty shelving in Special Collections.

Clearing and disassembling of shelves has begun.

Fans of shelves against wall.

Shelves waiting for assemble in the Archives

Kodak ledgers on shelving in Archives

Kodak advertising ledgers in their home

Archival boxes on shelves in Archives.

Doesn’t take long to fill up the shelves.

We are looking forward to an exciting Summer and Fall with A&SC finally located in one place! Check back here for move updates and photographs.

 

“It is most strange to know that the invasion has begun…” Remembrance Day 2015

In 2011 the Ryerson Archives received the Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association Archives. Among the boxes and files was a scrapbook kept by Alumnae President Grace Bolton. In the scrapbook were letters home from the front during World War II. The Association had been sending Christmas boxes and care packages to their Nurses and Doctors serving in Europe and South Africa.

Perhaps the most poignant letter was sent from a Nursing Sister enlisted with the R.C.A.M.C (Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps) from an undisclosed hospital in an undisclosed place in Europe. The letter was written 3 days after D-Day, when Allied forces stormed the Beaches of Normandy.

RG946_01_03_01_15_02.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving overseas, June 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.15

“This is a bit disjointed, but the mess is crowded and noisy, radio blaring, and so difficult for me to concentrate. The censors will not allow me to tell you what I am doing or where I am, but at a later date I will write you about what has taken place when it’s no longer any secret.”

She continues talking about staying overseas instead of going home (she was injured by shrapnel) and discusses the horrors of war on the land and the people.

RG946_01_03_01_15

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving overseas, June 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.15

“It is a great privilege to be in the thick of things in these days. I often think I was foolish not to come home, when I could have done so quite easily, but I know I should never be quite satisfied to be back, before it is finished at least over here. Life in the country is peaceful and very beautiful this time of year. It is most strange to know that the invasion has begun with all its horrors, heartaches and destruction of humanity and cities and buildings, whilst living here. Soon however we will begin to see the results in some of our grand boys who will be coming back to be patched up by us. They are simply magnificent in the way in which they accept the loss of legs and arms.”

Take a moment to pause and remember. Ryerson has a ceremony every November 11 in the Howard Kerr Hall quad by the flag pole.

Looking back – celebrating the classes of 1950, 1955, 1960, and 1965.

This Saturday October 3rd, Ryerson is hosting is annual alumni weekend activities. This year the feature years are the classes of 1950, 1955, 1960, 1965, 1975, 1990, and 2005. In celebration of this the Archives decided to look back at those years and see what was happening on campus. This two part blog starts by looking at the classes of 1950, 1955, 1960, and 1965.

 

Yearbook_1950

 

 

In the school year 1949-1950 Bud Evans and “Honest” John Vail were the SAC presidents, and Ted Toogood was appointed as the Athletic Director. There were 390 day school and 1355 evening school student were enrolled. The first “At Home” dance was held.

Ryerson’s First “At Home” Dance held in the gymnasium (Ryersonia yearbook 1950)

List of Faculty members (Ryersonia yearbook 1950)

Ryerson Faculty and Staff, circa 1949. (History Documentation file, 1949)

RIOT was held for the first time on March 3.

RIOT 1950 football sketch featuring Ted Toogood as “Coach Nogood”. (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1950)

CJRT began broadcasting on November 1st, and the first live T.V. show in Canada was broadcast from Ryerson on November 14th.

First live Canadian Television Broadcast at Ryerson, November 1949. [Ryersonia Yearbook, 1950)

Most significantly Ryerson graduated its first class of 212 graduates on Friday May 12. Click here for Principal Howard Kerr’s commencement address.

 

1955

 

In the school year 1954-1955 the Blue and Gold Ball was held on February 16th at the Royal York Hotel, and RIOT ’55 was titled “Ghouls and Dolls”. The Ryerson Opera Workshop (ROW) staged Mademoiselle Angot in the Bloor Collegiate auditorium.

Blue and Gold Ball, 1955 (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1955)

ROW ’55 – Mademoiselle Angot (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1955)

“The Ryerson Story” – a CBC TV film presentation directed by Rollo Gamble of the NFB and commentated by Lloyd Bochner – was filmed at Ryerson. It featured many Ryerson students and highlighted Ryerson’s various programs. It aired on February 20th.

Ryersonian article, dated January 19, 1955, about the filming of the Ryerson Story. (History 1955 documentation file)

Photograph of Lloyd Bochner with Ryerson students. Clockwise from top left: Margo McGregor, Gerry Farkas, Vicky Jory, Lloyd Bochner, and Bill Burrows RTA ’56. (RG 95.1)

And on May 6th, 1955 Ryerson graduated 365 students from the following programs: Architectural Technology; Business Administration; Secretarial Science; Electrical Technology; Electronic Technology; Radio and Television Arts; Fashion; Furniture and Interior Design; Journalism; Printing Management; Instrument Technology; Research Technology; Public Health Laboratory Technology; Laboratory Technology; Hotel, Resort, and Restaurant Administration; Home Economics; Childhood Management; Mechanical Technology; Metallurgical Technology; Tool Design and Technology; and Photographic Arts.

1955 Convocation program of event

 

1960

 

In the school year 1959-1960 Bruce Dobbs was the SAC President. RIOT 1960 was held at the Riverside Auditorium November 18th-21st.

Photographs from RIOT and ROW. (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1960)

The Blue and Gold Ball was held on February 5th, crowning Joan Fujimoto as Miss Ryerson and Papa and Mama Wycik as Mr. & Mrs. Ryerson.

February 11th, 1950 edition of the Ryersonian newspaper.

The second unit of Howard Kerr Hall was taken over by Ryerson.

March 9th, 1960 edition of the Ryersonian Newspaper.

Convocation for 516 graduates was held May 6th at Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.

Graduation at Yorkminster Church (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1960)

The Graduation banquet was held on the evening of May 5th. The Gold and Silver medalists were presented with their awards during the dinner.

Awards Night programme (RG 4.04.01.11)

Lynn Fournier, Molly Copus, Howard Kerr, and Bruce Dobbs at the graduation banquet after receiving their medals. (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1960)

 

1965

 

The school year 1964-1965 saw some major changes at Ryerson – the first being its name.

A 1963-1964 and a 1964-1965 course calendar showing the change in the school’s name.

Open House held October 24 – the same weekend as Homecoming.

Wednesday October 14th, 1964 edition of the Ryersonian newspaper.

The clock tower on South Kerr Hall get carillon bells. Wayne Detcher played the bells for the first time during a Christmas Carol concerts over the lunch hour in December.

Carillon bells in Kerr Hall Clock Tower. January 12th, 1965 edition of the Ryersonian

Ryerson’s annual graduation banquet was held April 8th

Graduation banquet menu and programme of events (RG 4.04.01.16)

Ryerson also changed its coat-of-arms late in the year.

Old coat of arms

New coat of arms, adopted in March or April of 1965

And finally graduation was held May 7th with a morning and an afternoon ceremony.

Convocation programme, Friday May 7th, 1965 (RG 76.04.01.16)

Convocation photographs (Ryersonia, 1965)

We hope you enjoyed this brief journay down memory lane – For more information on these years stop by the Archives (LIB387) on Saturday October 3rd and visit our Anniversary display. We will be open 11:00am to 2:00pm.

Next month we will look at the classes of 1975, 1990, and 2005

 

 

Points of Interest from the Collections – The Creation of the Archives part deux

To round out the month looking back at the creation of the Archives, We have discovered the first Archives report dated June 29, 1971.

It was interesting reading for Archives staff as it answered questions about the collection and how it was filed and stored.  It also delves into the beginning of the retention of objects as a way to preserve Ryerson’s history along side the textual and published materials.

To view the report click on the picture below:

A report of the Ryerson Archives by James Peters Archivist for President Donald Mordell June 29, 1971

Many of the items mentioned in the report are on display or in open storage in the current Archives reading room. This includes Egerton Ryerson’s desk and bust, The Ryersonian and Eyeopener newspapers, and the course calendars.

We encourage you to stop by the Archives and take a walk through Ryerson’s history.

 

Points of Interest from the Collections – The Creation of the Archives

For the month of August, Archives and Special Collections will blog bi-weekly with points of interest from our collections.

This week we look at documents connected to the birth of the Archives at Ryerson.

In 1970 Ryerson Polytechnical Institute invited Professor D. McCormack Smyth to conduct a study of the structure of government at Ryerson.  The Smyth Commission Report was published and its 7th recommendation was the creation of an institutional Archives.

Page from report stating that an Archives be established to preserve historical documents.

Recommendation No. 7 – Smyth Commission report

On November 11, 1970 Ryerson President Donald Mordell sent out the following memo to all Deans, Chairmen, and Department heads.

Page 1 of the memo from Donald Mordell. Outlines what materials should be kept and asking people not to throw anything away until a system was in place to sort through the items to determine whether or not they were Archival.

Page 1 – November 11, 1970 memorandum

Page 2 of Mordell memo - Library will be storing the potential Archival material until a proper system is in place. He asks people to properly mark the materials.

Page 2 – November 11, 1970 memorandum

 

On November 17, 1970 Mordell sent the following memo to Jim Peters, a professor in the Department of English:

Donald Mordell memo to Jim Peters - thanking him for his suggestions and asking him if he would be interested in taking the position of Archivist.

Memo from Donald Mordell to Jim Peters

The Archives was officially established in 1971 as a special new department associated with the Library. Jim Peters was appointed Ryerson’s first Archivist.

Technikos magazine article announcing the establishment of Ryerson's Archives within the Library with Jim Peters as the Archivist.

Technikos magazine, Spring 1971

To learn more about the Archives and see what we have in our collections drop by. The Archives are open Monday – Friday from 9:00am t0 4:00pm.

“I know I should never be quite satisfied to be back, before it is finished at least over here” – Wellesley Nurses in World War II

In celebration of the Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association’s 100th anniversary, the Archives focuses on the Alumnae Association and its members serving at home and overseas during World War II.

The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing had graduated twenty-five classes at the time World War II was declared in the Fall of 1939. Like their nursing sisters before them (8 of 10 members of Wellesley’s first class of graduates served overseas in World War I), Wellesley Alumnae continued the tradition with many enlisting to serve in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps., the Royal Canadian Air Force, and the Royal Navy during World War II. They served in hospitals and casualty clearing stations in Africa, Italy, England, and France between 1940 and 1946.

When the Association’s collection was donated to the Ryerson University Archives in 2011, included was a scrapbook compiled by Grace Bolton, member of the Alumnae Association’s executive, that spotlights the Association’s activities here at home. In it are pages detailing the Association’s activities which included the mailing of care packages to Nurses serving in the Military and alumnae serving overseas in non-military capacities during World War II.

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List of items, and their cost, sent in boxes to the Wellesley Alumnae serving overseas. RG 946.01.03.01.12

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Contents of box sent to a Wellesley Alumnae working with children in England, 1946. RG 946.1.03.01.02

There are also letters from a variety of aid organizations such as the British Minesweeper’s Auxiliary, Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve Ladies Auxiliary, and the Navy Knitters thanking the Association for their knit and monetary donations. The British Minesweepers Auxiliary supplied the wool for the knitting projects – blue or grey.

RG946_01_03_01_75

Letter written to Grace Bolton from Harry N. Barry, member of the Navy Knitters committee, thanking the Wellesley Alumnae Association for their knit contributions. RG 946.01.03.01.75

RG946_01_03_01_76

General letter sent to all contributors letting them know that the Navy Knitters have discontinued their operations and would now be giving their support to the Red Cross and the Overseas Parcels League which also has a knitting program. RG 946.01.03.01.76

RG946_01_03_01_56

Letter of thanks from the Ladies Auxiliary of the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve to the Wellesley Alumnae Association for their knit contributions including turtle neck sweaters, gloves, helmets, and socks. RG 946.01.03.01.56

RG946_01_03_01_36_01

“Dear Miss Bolton – This organization is grateful to you and the members of Wellesley Alumnae group for your generous donation of twenty-three articles. We acknowledge receipt of 12 pairs of socks, 1 helmet, 6 seamens caps + 4 scarves” RG 946.01.03.01.36

These are just some examples of what the Association was doing on the home front. They also hosted fundraisers, and sent money to support schools in England.

The scrapbook also contains letters and airgraphs home from the people the Alumnae Association sent care packages to. The boxes contained everything from cheese, crackers, and chocolate to silk stockings, bobby pins, powder puffs, and sanitary napkins – all items that weren’t readily available in Europe because of the on-going war and rationing. These letters, at times light and fun and at others introspective, give the reader an idea of life serving as a woman and a nurse in the Canadian Military in a theatre of war.  Another interesting aspect of the letters is that they are free of censoring. Every piece of mail sent home went through a censor board – leaving some letters marked with black or having had sections cut out.

This letter was written by a Wellesley Alumnus who was living in Ireland. This section of letter touches on the rationing that was taking place in Europe and here at home in Canada.

RG946_01_03_01_34_04.01

Letter sent from Wellesley Alumnae in Ireland. RG 946.01.03.01.34

“The box as soon as ever it arrived – such variety too. We see very little “candy” on account of the sugar rationing. Eggs too are rationed. Bobby pins are very scarce + the new biscuits are all made with the dark flour. So you see your box is really a great treat – on the whole we aren’t a bit to be pidied [sic] for if we don’t get one thing like sugar, we get golden syrup or something to make up.”

She continues in her letter to describe what she has been doing.

RG946_01_03_01_34_06.01

Letter sent from Wellesley Alumnae in Ireland. RG 946.01.03.01.34

“I too have been busy at our First Aid Post here. I am at present running a Home Nursing Class on Monday nights & on Friday nights a first aid class. I am in charge of “The Post” & attend for “exercises” or blitz turn-out.”

This second letter is from a Wellesley Alumnus enlisted with the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps (R.C.A.M.C.) stationed at #7 Canadian General Hospital in Taplow, England at the time the letter was written.  She writes about all the great things sent over in her box including Modess – a brand of sanitary napkins.

RG946_01_03_01_26_05.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at the #7 Canadian General Hospital in Taplow, England. January 12, 1943. RG 946.01.03.01.26

“Of course, I was tickled to also find Kleenex and Modess in the box. I know they seem like funny gifts but we all have to get them from home.”

She goes on to talk about her leave, taken in Scotland between Christmas and New Year’s.

RG946_01_03_01_26_04.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at the #7 Canadian General Hospital in Taplow, England. January 12, 1943. RG 946.01.03.01.26

“We also visited Dunrobin Castle – the home of the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland, half of which they have turned into a convelescent military hospital. It’s beautiful – sits on a hill overlooking the sea – in Sutherland-shire. Dunrobin, by the way, is the castle which Goering said was going to be his summer home after the Germans had conquered England. Some hope eh?”

Dunrobin_Castle_2011

Dunrobin Castle, as it stood in 2011. Very distinctive style not often seen in the Scottish Country side.

The third letter is from a Wellesley Alumnus enlisted with the R.C.A.M.C. stationed at #1 Canadian General Hospital in Horsham, England at the time of writint. It is actually an Airgraph – which was a letter that had been photographed, shipped as a negative, and printed out as a photograph and mailed to the recipient. In her airgraph she writes about the package sent and Christmas at the Hospital.

RG946_01_03_01_30_04

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at the #1 Canadian General Hospital in Horsham, England. January 17, 1943. RG 946.01.03.01.30

“My dear Grace – You can’t imagine how thrilled I was with that gorgeous box that arrived to-day. I just stood and gazed at it. It was so beautifully wrapped and packed, and all the marvellous things in it. Really you have all put a lot of thought, time and effort into packing these boxes and it is indeed appreciated. But Wellesley was always noted for doing things in a grand way. People are always admiring my identification bracelet. We had a good time in the hospital – a turkey dinner with all the trimmings, even ice cream. The Red Cross ladies brought xmas stockings filled with cigarettes, candies, socks, etc which the boys loved. The Wards were all decorated & each one had a xmas tree. In the afternoon there was a picture show & evening a concert so the lads all went to bed like tired little boys.”

She continues on to describe the hospital’s set up and to complain about the lack of trained orderlies:

RG946_01_03_01_30_05.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at the #1 Canadian General Hospital in Horsham, England. January 17, 1943. RG 946.01.03.01.30

“We have quite a nice Hosp. & well equipped, but few orderlies with much training. I asked the Registrar one day why the scores of trained men in Mil. Hosps in Canada…he said that the Hosps wouldn’t release them. Seems were not sent over. A very peculiar attitude to take toward the fighting forces, doesn’t it, for when the time for action comes, it is trained people we shall need. Each ward is  a separate hut with 40 beds, but we often have to put in extra beds. 3 stoves provide sufficient heat & we have good floors – battleship linoleum. Each hut has a pantry, 2 bathrooms, 3 toilets, a sluice room (service room in Canada), linen room & an office. The huts are placed opposite each other on either side of a covered runway. The administrative offices, stores, main linen room & main kitchen quarters and the personnel are all located in different parts of the hospital area. There is a huge vegetable garden and quite a nice little flower garden. Two chapels – Prot & R.C…”

The fourth letter, also an airgraph, is from a Nursing Sister enlisted with the R.C.A.M.C. and stationed in a military hospital in Sonderwater, Transvaal, Africa. She thanks the Alumnae for the package and its hard to get items like kleenex and Kotex.

RG946_01_03_01_24_01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at a military hospital in Transvaal, Africa, March 19, 1943. RG 946.01.03.01.24

“Dear Miss Bolton: The lovely parcel arrived today and was there a variety in it? The kleenex and kotex both were especially acceptable since they are almost unobtainable here. Also the bobby pins are very scarce. The eats are very acceptable and we are going to start on the cheese tonight. It is my favourite brand.”

She goes on to describe the set up of the hospital where she is serving, and the weather in Africa.

RG946_01_03_01_24_02

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at a military hospital in Transvaal, Africa, March 19, 1943. RG 946.01.03.01.24

“I have just finished a term of night duty as night supervisor which was a very posh job. The buildings (wards) are all separate so you see there is lots of walking as there are seventeen of them but the weather was simply lovely and I enjoyed it ever so much as I didn’t mind all the walking. We really haven’t had a hot summer here this year. Last year at Durban we came off duty ringing wet and they say it is just as hot this year down there. It was also hot here last year but something must have happened to the weather man and I hope he makes the winter just as mild. We have only had a fair amount of rain too. But you should see the rain here – it isn’t any of that nice mild rain we get at home but deluge type.”

Near the end of her letter she talks about re-signing up and the hopes for the war’s end:

RG946_01_03_01_24_02.03

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at a military hospital in Transvaal, Africa, March 19, 1943. RG 946.01.03.01.24

“We signed for service anywhere in the world today so I would get a thrill if I could move to a distant part again and I am concentrating on it to see if it will do any good!!! Some of our first group have gone up north the luckies. I hadn’t intended staying another year at first but after a spell of homesickness at Christmas time I got over the feeling and when the contracts came out I signed as by that time everyone was beginning to think the war would be over this year. So here’s hoping.”

The fifth letter, written on official R.C.A.M.C. letterhead, is from a Nursing Sister stationed at #18 Canadian General Hospital in Cherry Tree, England. She starts her letter by thanking the Alumnae for the box she received.

RG946_01_03_01_21_01.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at a #18 Canadian General Hospital in Cherry Tree, England. December 19, 1943. RG 946.01.03.01.21

My dear Grace, Please thank the Wellesley Alumnae for the most beautiful parcel. I received yesterday. I did not think it was possible to get such a varied assortment of good things in Canada now. Stockings, cake, candy, tooth powder and brush, soap, gum and a can of steak and onions which I can hardly wait to open, but am trying to hold off until Xmas. How they can get so much into one box I really don’t know.”

She continues on in her letter to describe how they decorated the wards for Christmas:

RG946_01_03_01_21_01.02

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at a #18 Canadian General Hospital in Cherry Tree, England. December 19, 1943. RG 946.01.03.01.21

“Weather here not at all like Xmas, cold enough but pouring with rain. Our chief occupation at the moment is gathering armsful of holly to decorate the wards and mess of Xmas. The holly is very beautiful and grows like a weed all over this area. It makes a delightful splash of colour in otherwise rather drab wards. I must finish off , it is almost time to draw the black out.”

The sixth letter was written by a Nursing Sister enlisted with the R.C.A.M.C. and stationed with the #10 Canadian General Hospital in Watford, England. She talks about the work in the hospital and mentions a job well done by the staff.

RG946_01_03_01_16_02.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at a #10 Canadian General Hospital in Watford, England. January 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.16

RG946_01_03_01_16_01.02

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at a #10 Canadian General Hospital in Watford, England. January 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.16

“We here in England, really are most comfortable and well fed and except for the convoy we had from Italy our work here has been just about similar to our work in the army at home. We have no claim to any honour or sympathy. I certainly enjoy England & our work throughly.

“One thing I think maybe our staff did well was the efficient manner in which they admitted Italian casualties (200 + some) over 100 stretcher cases. They arrived here after nine p.m. were put to bed, bathed, temp taken, given a hot meal, all seen by medical or surgical officers and all settled by twelve o’clock. All the sisters were on duty till then.”

The seventh letter was sent from by a Nursing Sister enlisted with the R.C.A.M.C. and stationed with the #2 Canadian General Hospital in Bramshott, England. She talks of all the things there are to do and places to go on her days off.

RG946_01_03_01_18_02

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at a #2 Canadian General Hospital in Bramshott, England. February 1, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.18

“So far I am enjoying myself immensely. We have been very busy but we have a very nice hospital to work in and all the boys are so good – and lots of fun. We have a day off each week and there are so many interesting places to visit that its quite a problem to make up one’s mind where to go. London is near enough to visit for a day and there again there are a thousand and one things to see and do. There are always good plays & concerts. Lots of movies and all the famous places to see. I have had just one leave so far and spent half in Bristol and half in Devon. Bristol was dreadfully bombed during the Blitz but they all carry on just the same. Devon is very lovely – red soil and fields of heather and rolling hills.”

The eighth letter is sent from a Nursing Sister enlisted with the R.C.A.M.C. and stationed at #4 Casualty Clearing Station in Vasto Italy. She describes her activities since shipping out to Italy.

RG946_01_03_01_23_01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving at a #4 Casualty Clearing Station in Vasto, Italy, March 3, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.23

” I want to thank you and all the members of the Wellesley Alumnae for the very nice box you sent me for Christmas. Whoever was responsible for putting it together deserves a lot of credit as once again you have made it very useful as well as attractive box. Unfortunately our December and January mail had been rerouted and was awaiting us here in Italy when we arrived. But shortly after landing, I was sent in company with five other girls up over here to #4 Casualty Clearing Station to help out.”

The ninth letter is sent from a Nursing Sister enlisted with the R.C.A.M.C at an undisclosed hospital in an undisclosed place in Europe. The letter was written 3 days after D-Day, when Allied forces stormed the Beaches of Normandy.

RG946_01_03_01_15_02.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving overseas, June 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.15

“This is a bit disjointed, but the mess is crowded and noisy, radio blaring, and so difficult for me to concentrate. The censors will not allow me to tell you what I am doing or where I am, but at a later date I will write you about what has taken place when it’s no longer any secret.”

She continues talking about staying overseas instead of going home (she was injured by shrapnel) and discusses the horrors of war on the land and the people.

RG946_01_03_01_15

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving overseas, June 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.15

“It is a great privilege to be in the thick of things in these days. I often think I was foolish not to come home, when I could have done so quite easily, but I know I should never be quite satisfied to be back, before it is finished at least over here. Life in the country is peaceful and very beautiful this time of year. It is most strange to know that the invasion has begun with all its horrors, heartaches and destruction of humanity and cities and buildings, whilst living here. Soon however we will begin to see the results in some of our grand boys who will be coming back to be patched up by us. They are simply magnificent in the way in which they accept the loss of legs and arms.”

There were no letters written in 1945, but the scrapbook finishes with several letters from 1946 – after the war was complete – from Nurses still located in Military hospitals overseas. This letter was sent from #7 Canadian General Hospital near Bayeux, France.

RG946_01_03_01_03_03.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving overseas, January 23, 1946. RG 946.01.03.01.03

“I really must apologize for not writing sooner to thank the alumnae for the lovely Christmas parcel which they so very kindly sent me. It’s such a nice feeling to know that, now that the war is over, the people at home haven’t forgotten those of us who are unfortunate enough to sill be on the wrong side or the Atlantic.”

Also included with the donation was a second scrapbook also compiled by Grace Bolton that further documents the Alumnae Associations activities here at home and stories about the Nursing Sisters overseas through newspaper clippings from a variety of newspapers.

A great source for information on the Canadian Medical Services in World War II is the following book:

Official History of the Canadian Medical Services 1939–1945

Listed below are other great sources of information about World War II and the people who served:

Canada and the Second World War – Veterans Affairs Canada

The Canadian War Museum

The Call to Duty – Canadian Nursing Sisters – Library and Archives Canada

To view this scrapbook in its entirety or to view other items in the The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection – please contact the Archives at archives@ryerson.ca or call (416) 979-5000 ext. 7027 to make an appointment.

All the news that’s fit to print – a brief history of Ryerson’s news outlets

In the age of social media there are many ways for news to be communicated. Faculty, staff, students, alumni, and the general public can find out what is going on around campus through Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and many other sources. How did Ryerson get the word out there before the internet and smart phones – let’s take a look.

Ryerson has had various departments and offices responsible for getting the official news out to the community and the public. The Office of Information Services, the Department of Community Relations, the Office of University Advancement, and now University Relations  were/are responsible to spreading the official word of Ryerson.

What’s Happening around Ryerson (1971-1977) was published once a week as an events calendar by the Department of Information Services. It was replaced by On Campus this Week (1977-1986). The Office of University Advancement published Campus News (2004-2009) which was emailed out to the Ryerson Community announcing individual events, campus notes, and other related information. This was discontinued in 2009 with the creation of Ryerson TodayThe Office of University Advancement, and now the Department of Communications, Government, and Community Engagement periodically send out news releases about significant Ryerson occurrences and events.

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The FORUM was a newsletter of information and opinion first published by the Department of Information Services September 12, 1977. The FORUM continued to be published by the Department of Community Relations, and the Office of University Advancement changing styles and formats. It went to a digital only format in 2006 and continued on until 2009 when it too was replaced by Ryerson Today.


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Technikos the news magazine for Ryerson Polytechnical Institute was first published in the Spring of 1971 by the Department of Information Services and according to then Ryerson President “it would be mailed to the home address of each undergraduate…Copies will also be sent to potential employers…high schools, colleges, universities, and Ryerson alumni…”. It was published twice yearly until Summer 1977 when, according to the Ryerson Rambler, “…the costs have caught up with us and a quality magazine like Technikos cannot be produced economically enough to enable us to send it to you regularly…” so publication was cut down to one magazine per year sent out during the summer months. In 1978 the name was changed to The Ryerson Review. Its last publication was Summer 1980.

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The Ryerson Rambler, first published in June of 1962, was Ryerson’s alumni magazine. It was published initially by the Students’ Union. According to then Ryerson Principal Howard Kerr, “It is hoped in time that the Ryerson Alumni Association will be sufficiently strong to assume the responsibility involved in the financing of this project…”. It would appear that the Alumni Association took over publication in 1967. The Rambler continued publication until 1972, when it was replaced by Technikos as a source of information for Ryerson Alumni.

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The Rambler returned in February of 1978 when the cost of producing Technikos became economically unfeasible. It was published 3 times per year. In 1994, the winter issue of the magazine was discontinued – replaced by What’s On, a newspaper-style newsletter. In 1997 they discontinued What’s On and started publishing the winter edition of the magazine again.

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20_RG151_04_1994WhatsonWith the spring 1997 edition the name changed to Ryerson Magazine and began publishing only twice a year. In 2001, it changed its name to Ryerson University, the magazine – reflecting the name change of the University from Ryerson Polytechnic University to Ryerson University. It changed its name again in 2002 to Alumni Magazine, with a final name change in 2011 to Ryerson University Magazine.

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On the student side of the School, Ryerson has had student created publications since its inception in 1948.

The School of Journalism began publishing a newspaper called the The Ryersonian in 1948. The first paper was published in December of that year. Starting in January of 1949 until April of 1951, the paper was published on a monthly or bi-monthly basis. In the 1951-1952 school year the paper began being published on a daily basis. It continued this way for many years, until they began publishing Tuesday – Friday, and then only on Wednesdays and Fridays. During the 1993-1994 school year it started its present schedule of weekly publication on Wednesdays. The paper is also available online at www.ryersonian.ca/.

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In June of 1949, the School of Graphic Arts,  and the Journalism program started printing Ryerson Daily News. It was a one page leaflet with Canadian and International news stories.

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It was replaced in September 1950 by The Little Daily. A one page information leaflet with news about Ryerson.

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Starting in 1950 they also published the Little Weekly, a larger format newspaper style publication. Both the Daily and the Weekly ended publication in January of 1951.

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To replace The Little Weekly, Journalism students started printing three different small newspapers on three different days – The Blue on Tuesdays, The White on Wednesdays, and The Gold on Thursdays. They were produced between February and April of that year. In March and April of 1951 Journalism also printed The Blue Review.

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The Campus Week also was created to replace the Little Weekly. First printed February 3, 1951, it was written and edited by Journalism students and printed by the the School of Graphic Arts. It had a four page format – mirroring that of The Ryersonian. It does not appear that this continued to be published in the 1951-1952 school year. There was an independent publication created in 1951 called “TY-PI”, created by first year students in the Graphic Arts and Journalism programs.

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In 1967 the Eyeopener Newspaper (at first called the Eyeopener Magazine) took its name from the Calgary Eye Opener, newspaper published by Bob Edwards 1902-1922. It was created because, as its first editor Tom Thorne stated, many students felt that the Ryersonian was not representative of all of Ryerson’s students. Published on Tuesdays by the Students’ Administrative Council on a weekly basis, it was a member of the Canadian University Press. During the 1968-1969 school year it began being publishing on Thursdays and starting in September 1990 it changed to its current schedule of publication on Wednesdays. The Eyeopener is available online at theeyeopener.com.

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All of these publications contain valuable information about the life and times of Ryerson and its students, staff, and faculty. They have been an invaluable resource for many research projects.

They are available for viewing in the Ryerson Archives. Please call (416 979 5000 ext. 7027) or email (archives@ryerson.ca) for an appointment.

Yousef Karsh at Ryerson

Yousef Karsh, world renowned photographer best known for his portraits of the many people who shaped the 20th century, visited Ryerson on December 4, 1957 to interview third year photography students for a position as one of his assistants.

Reginald Soame and Yousef Karsh

Ryerson Director of the School of Photographic Arts Reginald Soame and Yousef Karsh. (RG 95.1.72.12.01)

This visit was featured in the Ryersonian newspaper.

Story courtesy of the Ryersonian Newspaper

News story published December 5, 1957. (courtesy of the Ryersonian Newspaper)

Yousef Karsh, born December 23, 1908 in Armenia, immigrated to Canada in 1925 to live with his uncle, a photographer, in Sherbrooke, Quebec. This move would change his life. His original goal in life was to be a surgeon. In 1926 he went to work for his uncle and then apprenticed with John Garo in Boston. In 1931 he opened his own studio in Ottawa. The turning point in his career was befriending then Prime Minister of Canada William Lyon MacKenzie King. This friendship gave him the opportunity to photograph English Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1941, which Karsh felt changed his life.

He went on to do over 15 000 portrait sittings with some of the most influential people of the 20th Century. He travelled to London during WW II, photographing the Royal Family and others. In 1952 he began what would become a 17 month assignment with MacLean’s magazine documenting a post-war Canada.

He closed his Ottawa studio in June of 1992 and stopped taking commercial assignments as well. Yousef Karsh died July 13, 2002.

To learn more about Yousef Karsh visit www.karsh.org 

Special Collections has two Karsh photographs:

2008.001.1498.2 Portrait of a Soldier

2008.001.1498.3 Portrait of J. Gordon Forgo

The Ryerson Library also has many books including:

Canadian Prints and Drawings

In Search of Greatness: reflections of Yousef Karsh

Karsh: a biography in images

Karsh: American Legends 

Karsh Canadians

The Library also has some audio visual materials available:

Karsh is History

Karsh: The searching eye

Cosmetology, Barbering, and Goldsmithing – a look back at Ryerson’s first programs

Ryerson University offers more than 100 undergraduate and graduate programs, and is home to 40, 000 students and 2700 staff and faculty.  But how many students attended Ryerson the first year it opened?  What kinds of courses were available for students to take and are any of them still offered today? Let’s take a look back at the first year of the Ryerson Institute of Technology.

1948-1949

1948 Course Calendar

1948 Course Calendar

When the Institute opened its doors to approximately 200 students in September of 1948, it was one of four technical institutes run by the Department of Education for the Province of Ontario. The other 3 were: The Institute of Textiles (Hamilton); The Institute of Mining (Hailebury); and The Lakehead Technical Institute (Port Arthur).

It offered 4 different options for education: technological courses;  extension courses; courses supervised by Department of Education for other governmental departments; and courses for the University of Toronto.

Technological courses

There were 10 schools that first year that offered 2 year diploma and certificate courses on the level between high school and university. Admission requirements were a minimum of a grade 12 education or an equivalent standing based on age, practical experience, and educational background. Fees were a $5 registration fee, a $25 tuition, a $10 laboratory or shop fee, and a $10 Students’ council fee.  For non-resident British subject students tuition was $200, and for non-resident non-British subject students tuition was $300.

The schools were:

School of Architectural Draughting – architectural and structural draughting and design

Architecture

Architectural Draughting class. (Photograph from the 1948 course calendar)

School of Business – retail merchandising and business machines

Business machines

Business machines

School of Costume Design – dressmaking, pattern making, draping, and designing

Costume Design

Costume Design

School of Electronics – radio communications, radio and appliance servicing, industrial electronics, electronic laboratory practice, marine operating, announcing and production

Electronics

Electronics

School of Food Technology – commercial cooking and commercial baking

School of Furniture Crafts – cabinetmaking, upholstering, wood finishing, and furniture design

Furniture Crafts

Furniture Crafts

School of Graphic Arts – hand composition and typography, letterpress presswork, linotype, intertype, monotype, photo lithography, offset presswork, printing design and layout, bookbinding, and journalism

Graphic Arts

Graphic Arts

School of Jewellery and Horology – goldsmithing and gem setting, watch making and repair

Jewellery making

Jewellery making

School of Industrial and Mechanical Technology – general mechanical, tool design, tool and die making, mechanical drafting, and welding

Welding Fabrication

Welding Fabrication

School of Photography – portraiture, commercial, and industrial

Photography

Photography

With the exception of the School of Jewellery and Horology, all of these schools evolved into programs offered by Ryerson today.

Extension Courses

Ryerson also offered 2 extension courses at the trade level. They were Men’s tailoring, and Women’s tailoring. The  Admission requirements were a grade 10 or equivalent education and you had to be at least 16 1/2 years old. Course fees were the same as the Technology courses.

Women's Tailoring

Women’s Tailoring

The extension department evolved in to the present day G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education. The school now offers 88 certificate programs, and accreditation courses for 10 professional institutes and associations.

Department of Education supervised courses

Housed at Ryerson were courses offered by the Department of Labour and the Department of Health, which varied in length from 2 months to 9 months. Admission requirements, course of study, standards of attainment, and final exams were the responsibility of the sponsoring department. The Department of Education supplied the staff and supervised the courses. All the courses were trade courses. They were:

Department of Labour

Apprenticeship courses in building trades, millroom, and motor vehicle repair trade (2-3 months)

Barbering (9 months)

Barbering

Barbering

Hairdressing (9 months)

Cosmetology

Cosmetology

Stationery Engineering (9 months)

Department of Health

Certified Nursing Assistant course (9 months)

Courses for the University of Toronto

Offered by Ryerson, in co-operation with the University of Toronto, were 2 courses for their students.

Occupational Therapy – printing and woodworking

Institutional Management – commercial cooking

 

To learn more about Ryerson’s beginnings drop by the Ryerson University Archives. We are located on the 3rd floor of the Library in room LIB387.