Ryerson 7025 – Athletics and Intramurals

This year marks a special Anniversary at Ryerson University – a double anniversary. It has been 70 years since the founding of the school and 25 years since it achieved University status.

In conjunction with University wide celebrations, The Ryerson University and Archives has created an exhibit, running June 1 – October 31, looking back at the history of the school. For each month the exhibit is open we will feature in our blog one of the 5 themes of the exhibit: 5 pivotal moments in Ryerson’s history, Student Groups and Clubs, Student Government, Student Housing, and Athletics and Intramurals.

 

For October’s blog and the final installment in our special anniversary series we will look at Athletics and Intramurals – the spaces and the evolution of inter-university sport and intramurals between 1948 and 1993.

Athletic Spaces

The First Gymnasium

In 1950 Ryerson’s first gymnasium was located in a converted garage on Church Street. The space consisted of a spacious gymnasium with lockers and shower facilities, a social/common room, The Supply Store, a game room, a tuck shop, and a barber shop.

Ryerson’s first gymnasium (RG 95.1 Athletics CM51-6)

Kerr Hall Gymnasiums

In the 1964 2 new gymnasiums and a swimming pool opened in the brand new Howard Kerr Hall. The two gymnasiums could be utilized as 3 full sized basketball courts, 9 badminton courts, or 6 volleyball courts. The 23 metre swimming pool was built with 2 one-metre diving boards and a locker room.

Construction of Kerr Hall Pool, ca. 1962 (RG 95.1 Howard Kerr Hall)

Upper Gym in Kerr Hall, ca. 1963 (RG 95.1 Howard Kerr Hall)

Ryerson Athletic Centre

Opened in 1987, Ryerson’s unique underground Recreation and Athletics Centre provided 50,000 square feet of new facilities including 7 squash courts, two multipurpose gyms, a fitness training centre, a dance studio, a running track, and shower facilities. Built beneath the Kerr Hall Quadrangle, the two storey centre required a 30 foot excavation to accommodate it.

Construction of Ryerson Athletic Centre in Kerr Hall Quad, ca. 1985 (RG 395.40.06)

Construction of interior of the Ryerson Athletic Centre, ca. 1985 (RG 395.40.06)

Running track and court in Ryerson Athletic Centre, ca. 1985 (RG 395.40.06)

 

Running Track and court in the Ryerson Athletic Centre ca. 1988 (RG 395.40.06)

Atrium in Ryerson Athletic Centre ca. 1988 (RG 395.40.06)

Mattamy Athletic Centre

The Mattamy Athletic Centre, previously known as Maple Leaf Gardens, features a second floor fitness centre and a hardwood dance studio. Home of the Ryerson Rams basketball, volleyball, and hockey teams since 2012, the building also houses a full sized ice rink that can accommodate 2500 seated fans, team rooms, and Coca-Cola Court – a multipurpose gym court.

Eggy the Ram and Carleton the Bear in front of the future Mattamy Athletic Centre, formerly Maple Leaf Gardens (Ryerson Archives digital assets)

Puck drop by Prime Minister Stephen Harper at the official opening of the Mattamy Athletic Centre, 2012. Photographer: Clifton Li (Ryerson Archives Digital Assets)

Front cover of the 2012-2013 Ryerson Athletics year in review report (RG 30.116)

Athletics

The first sports teams organized at Ryerson in 1948 were men’s hockey, men’s basketball and co-ed swimming, and co-ed equestrian. The men’s hockey team was the first athletics group to compete wearing the blue, gold, and white uniform. In 1949 a women’s hockey team was established and played at Ravina Gardens in High Park.

Ryerson Football program – RIT vs RMC, Saturday October 20, 1962 (RG 30.27)

Women’s basketball team playing in the old gymnasium, ca. 1957 (RG 95.1 Basketball)

Men’s Basketball team on the court, ca. 1962. (RG 95.1 Basketball)

Ryerson Zebras men’s soccer team, ca. 1959 (RG 95.1 Soccer)

By 1993, Ryerson Athletics programs were much more developed. The teams competed nationally in the Canadian Inter-university Athletic Union in hockey, basketball, volleyball, soccer and swimming. Other Ryerson sports teams included badminton, fencing, squash, as well as men’s hockey and women’s figure skating.

Ryerson Athletics and Recreation brochure, ca. 1993 (RG 30.70)

Ryerson Inter-University Athletics annual report for 1993/1994 (RG 30.002.001)

Ryerson Rams Inter-University sports schedules. 1993-1994 (RG 30.002.001)

Intramurals

Intramural programs were designed with fun and creation in mind. There were no try-outs or skill requirements to join.

Because of a delay in the construction of Ryerson’s gymnasium on Church Street, the Athletics Association was not able to organize extensive intramural programs. By the Fall of 1951 intramural programs for basketball, badminton and volleyball were held in the gym, while hockey, swimming, riding, curling and skiing took place off campus.

Ryerson Riding Club at Whitewood Stables, ca. 1950 (RG 95.1 Clubs)

By 1993 over 3000 students participated in 40 different intramural programs. Leagues were divided into women’s, co-ed, and men’s groups and programs included aerobics, innertube water polo and line dancing.

Ryerson Intramurals fall schedule, 1995 (RG 30.16)

Snow Football intramural poster, 1995 (RG 30.16)

Innertube waterpolo intramural poster, 1995 (RG 30.16)

Co-ed Basketball intramural poster, 1995 (RG 30.16)

 

To learn more about Athletics and Intramurals at Ryerson – please visit the Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections located on the 4th floor of the library in Room LIB404.

 

Ryerson 7025 – Student Housing

This year marks a special Anniversary at Ryerson University – a double anniversary. It has been 70 years since the founding of the school and 25 years since it achieved University status.

In conjunction with University wide celebrations, The Ryerson University and Archives has created an exhibit, running June 1 – October 31, looking back at the history of the school. For each month the exhibit is open we will feature in our blog one of the 5 themes of the exhibit: 5 pivotal moments in Ryerson’s history, Student Groups and Clubs, Student Government, Student Housing, and Athletics and Intramurals.

This month marks the start of a new school year and for thousands of Ryerson students the first time living away from home. So it is fitting that for September’s blog we will look at student housing at Ryerson.

 

When Ryerson first opened in 1948, there was no campus housing for students. Students rented their own apartments, lived in rooming houses or in various YMCA or YWCA facilities. For the 1957-1958 school year Ryerson’s Students’ Adminstrative Council started a housing registry – to help students find accommodations in the city.

Ryerson Housing Registry, 1984

Church Street Annexes

In the late 1950s – early 1960s Ryerson purchased 323 and 333 Church Street for the purpose of providing housing to male students. Between 10 and 12 students lived in each building. After Kerr Hall residence opened in 1960, the students rooming in the Church Street residences were allowed to use Kerr Hall’s amenities.

 

323 Church Street (RG 95.1.13.03.01)

333 Church Street

 

Kerr Hall – Eric Palin Hall

Kerr Hall, renamed Eric Palin Hall in 1969, was Ryerson’s first residence. An all male dormitory that housed 42 students. Located in the refurbished Working Boys Home at 63 Gould Street (Now Oakham House). It opened in the Fall of 1960. In its first year running it cost students $10 per week to live there. It closed in 1972.

 

Oakham House/Palin Hall ca. 1964

Dorm room in Oakham House, 1960

Bond House – O’Keefe House

Bond House opened its doors as a men’s residence in 1964. Home to 33 students on 3 floors, it changed its name to O’Keefe House in 1978. It would eventually become a co-ed residence. O’Keefe House closed its doors at the end of the 2017-2018 school year.

Bond House/O’Keefe House

Neill-Wycik College

The Student Housing group of the Ryerson Students’ Administrative Council joined the Co-op College and applied for incorporation in 1967 under the name “Neill-Wycik” – Neill for A. S. Neill the founder of Summerhill School in the U. K. and Wycik in honour of Mama and Papa Wycik.

The co-operative ran 3 (all male and co-ed) houses in Toronto for Ryerson students. They were located at 707 Spadina Avenue, 310 Jarvis Street, and 325 Church Street. They also rented 2 floors in the Rochdale College co-operative building at 341 Bloor Street West starting in 1968.

325 Church Street (RG 95.1.13.03.01)

The purpose built Neill-Wycik College student residence building opened in November of 1970. It housed 800 students on 22 floors.

Neill-Wycik College (RG 122.10.094)

International Living/Learning Centre

Hotel Ibis, located at 240 Jarvis Street, was purchased by Ryerson Polytechnical Institute in August of 1993. The 11 storey building would be home to 270 co-ed students as well as the new home for the Hospitality and Tourism Management Program at Ryerson.

International Living/Learning Centre (RG 395.40.16)

Pitman Hall

Pitman Hall is located at 160 Mutual Street. It has 14 floors and 565 rooms – with each floor having communal kitchen, lounge, and laundry facilities. The cafeteria is located on the main floor. This residence is co-ed.

Pitman Hall (RG 395.40.16)

HOEM Residence

Opened in the Fall of 2018, Ryerson’s newest residence HOEM is Ryerson’s largest residence with 30 floors and 593 rooms. All suites are fully furnished and include a kitchen, living room, and single, private bedrooms. A co-ed residence that is open to both first and upper year students. HOEM was built and owned by Canadian Student Communities Inc. and is operated in partnership with Ryerson University. To learn more about HOEM, visit their web page here.

HOEM Student Residence was built and is owned by Canadian Student Communities Inc. It is operated in partnership with Ryerson University

To learn more about Ryerson’s history – please visit the Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections located on the 4th floor of the library in Room LIB404.

Stay tuned for month for the final blog in the series – Student Athletics and Intramurals.

Ryerson 7025 – Five Pivotal Moments in Ryerson’s History

This year marks a special Anniversary at Ryerson University – a double anniversary. It has been 70 years since the founding of the school and 25 years since it achieved University status.

In conjunction with University wide celebrations, The Ryerson University and Archives has created an exhibit, running June 1 – October 31, looking back at the history of the school. For each month the exhibit is open we will feature in our blog one of the 5 themes of the exhibit: 5 pivotal moments in Ryerson’s history, Student Groups and Clubs, Student Government, Student Housing, and Athletics and Intramurals.

For June’s blog – we will look at some key moments in the University’s history.

 

Five Pivotal Moments in Ryerson’s History

Moment #1 Open for Business

In August of 1948 the Ryerson Institute of Technology was founded “as an experiment in post-secondary education and an alternative to the traditional apprenticeship system”. With only two weeks to advertise – Ryerson opened in September of 1948 with an enrollment of 210 students, each paying just $25 tuition.

 

Advertisement on page 13 of the August 11, 1948 edition of the Kitchener-Waterloo Record newspaper.

 

Moment #2 RIT to RPI

On April  26, 1963 “An Act Respecting Ryerson Polytechnical Institute” was formally declared by the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. Along with the change it name from Ryerson Institute of Technology to Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, the school became independent of the various governmental bodies that controlled it and would now be regulated by a Board of Governors.

 

Front page of the March 16, 1963 edition of The Ryersonian, the Ryerson student newspaper.

 

Moment #3 A Question of Degrees

In 1971 Bill 97 was passed in the Ontario Legislature enabling Ryerson Polytechnical Institute the ability to grant degrees. The first 9 degrees, in Interior Design, Business Management, and Geodetic Sciences, were handed out at the May 26, 1972 convocation ceremony. Ontario Premier Bill Davis received an “honourary” Bachelor of Technology in Public Administration at the ceremony.

 

Photograph of 7 of the 9 first Ryerson students to receive degrees. Premier William Davis is seated second from right. (RG 4.96, Photographer: Jerry Davey)

 

Moment #4 RPI to RPU

On May 27, 1991 the Ryerson Board of Governors and Academic Council (Senate) gave their support to the proposal the the school seek full university status. Two years later on June 1, 1993 the dream was realized when Ryerson Polytechnic University was recognized by Royal Assent.

 

Ryerson President Terry Grier celebrating University status. (RG 76.14.723)

 

Moment #5 RPU to RU

In 2000, seven years after achieving university status, Ryerson opts to change its name to Ryerson University – with its formal name remaining Ryerson Polytechnical University. Two years later on June 27, 2002 the name is formally recognized by the government and changed to Ryerson University.

 

Signage outside of the Ryerson University bookstore and parking garage. (Archives Digital Content)

There are many more pivotal and significant moments throughout our 70 year history – so many that they would not all fit in this blog, but if you would like to learn more about them – please visit the Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections located on the 4th floor of the library in Room LIB404. You can also take a look at the University’s anniversary page here.

Stay tuned for next month’s entry when we look at student clubs and groups.

A Window in Time – 1899

What is that date on the window?

The Archives and Special Collections (A&SC) windows feature a series of seemingly random numbers worked into the window’s graphic pattern. The numbers are actually dates, chosen by ASC staff, that are significant to the City of Toronto, Ryerson University, and Archives and Special Collections. Over the course of the next year our blog will feature some of the window dates and explain their significance.

1899

2005.001.3.259. Canadian Kodak Co., Ltd. Headquarters (1899-1901), 41 Colborne Street, Toronto

In 1899, after successfully operating on the American market for over a decade, George Eastman dispatched Kodak employee John G. Palmer to Toronto to determine the viability of establishing a subsidiary in Canada. Palmer discovered a robust market for photographic products and, on November 8, 1899, Canadian Kodak Co., Limited was incorporated under the Ontario Company’s act. The nascent company established headquarters in downtown Toronto, embarking on a relationship with the city that would last more than a century and would constitute the heart of the company’s manufacturing operations in Canada.

For more information on Kodak Canada, please visit https://library.ryerson.ca/asc/2015/01/kodak-in-toronto-1899-2005-a-century-of-traces/

 

Practical Nursing – nursing notes from The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association fonds

The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association fonds came to the Ryerson Archives and Special Collections in 2011. In it are several notebooks filled with course notes, and practical knowledge for the student nurse.

One of the notebooks dates to the 1920’s and belonged to Wellesley School of Nursing class of 1925 graduate Elsie Kathleen Jones. Elsie K. returned to The Wellesley in 1928 and became the Director of Nursing in 1937, the role she held until her retirement in 1964.

Elsie K. Jones student notebook (RG 946.03.12.02)

In the notebook there are notations regarding everything from making a proper hospital bed and caring for the sheets, to recognizing and treating a hemorrhage in a patient. The following are some excerpts from the notebook.

“To Make a Closed bed”

To Make a Closed Bed

  • Loosen all the covers, removing one article at a time. Fold and place on a chair
  • Brush mattress well and turn from end to end
  • Place mattress protector on mattress
  • Put on lower sheet, wide hem at top, tucking in nine (9”) at top of mattress drawing tightly and turning straight corners.
  • Place the draw rubber, pulling on tightly, so there are no wrinkles
  • Place draw sheet, folding about 1/3 under at the top and tucking in tightly on each side
  • Place top sheet with the hem wrong side up, first coming to top of bed. Tuck in at the foot and make straight corners
  • Place blanket about 9” from top of the bed. Tuck in at the foot and make straight corners.
  • Then fold top sheet over the blanket and tuck in on both sides
  • Place the spread, reaching to the top of the bed, making straight corner at the bottom.
  • Place two pillows in bed. See that the pillows are well on the corners of the slips. Fold and place with closed end toward the door

The notebook also included instructions on how to make an “Ether” or surgical bed. The following are instructions for making up a surgical tray:

“Surgical dressing tray”

Surgical dressing tray

  1. Six packages of absorbent wipes
  2. Two large and two small dressings
  3. One package of sterile towels
  4. Set of instruments (forceps, scissors, probe)
  5. Adhesive straps
  6. Adhesive tape
  7. Antiseptic powder (Borace or Bismuth Formic Iodide)
  8. Bandages 2” x 3”
  9. Bandage scissors
  10. Curved basin
  11. Sterile doctor’s gloves
  12. Sterile bowl or basin of warm boracic solution
  13. Packing

The nurses were also responsible to pre-treating the bedding if stained before sending them out to be washed:

“Removing stains from bedding”

Removing Stains

Blood stains are soaked in cold water, then washed with soap and tepid water. For tea, coffee, and fruit stains use boiling water. If stains are still very persistent, use a solution of oxalic acid and rinse well afterwards in cold water.

Cocoa or anything containing milk use cold water

Grease stains, use hot water and soap or benzene

Iron Rust – spread over boiling water cover with salt and lemon juice, place in sun, if possible, and rinse thoroughly before sending to laundry

Ink stains – cover with salt and lemon juice and rinse thoroughly

Iodine – use ammonia or alcohol

When it came to treating their patients there were basic instructions such as recognizing sings of and type of fevers and proper care of thermometers:

“Types of Fever and care of thermometer”

 

Care of thermometer

Keep thermometer in bichloride of mercury solution 1-1000. Wash in cold water and dry before giving to patient

Types of Fever

  • Continuous fever which remains high with slight variations
  • Remittent, which remain above normal with considerable variations between highest and lowest temperature
  • Intermittent – alternately rises to high fever and falls to or below normal

The notebook also has a number of recipes for poultices, enemas, purgatives, and various medical solutions used by nurses to treat a variety of medical conditions. The Linseed poultice was used for treating chest congestion and pneumonia:

“Linseed poultice”

Linseed Poultice

Is made from linseed or ground flax seed meal. It is most effectual because it can be used at higher temperatures with blistering, as the linseed contains considerable oil.

Preparation

For a small poultice, use about 2/3 cup of linseed to 1 cup boiling water. Add the linseed slowly to the boiling water, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon or spatula. Turn the gas low and just let come to a boil. Remove from gas and beat vigorously. Spread the linseed about 3/4” thick on poultice gauze leaving a good margin for folding in. Carry to the patient between heated plates. Have ready oiled muslin flannel protector binder and pins

*Note – Linseed poultice must be hot, light and smooth.

To view the notebook in its entirety or look through other items in this fonds – please contact the Ryerson Archives at archives@ryerson.ca.

 

 

 

The New Archives and Special Collections Reading Room is Open for Business!

Now open to all students, staff, faculty!

The new Archives and Special Collections reading room is now open for business. We are now located on the 4th floor of the Library in LIB 404, adjacent to the new quiet study and teaching room, LIB405. The Archives and Special Collections reading room is open from Monday – Friday form 9-5.
Artifacts and exhibits are still being installed, but we are open for visitors and researchers. Here are a few photographs of our new digs.

New Quiet Study Area:

A large quiet study area, LIB405, is now open as well, and is available during library opening hours, but will occasionally be closed for booked classes. Signage will be posted indicating scheduled bookings.

For Instructors and Faculty: Teaching With Archival and Special Collections Material

If you are a teaching a class that might benefit from including primary source material, the quiet study/teaching space can be booked for classes. The archives and special collections staff can work with you to select books, photographs, documents, artifacts or other primary source materials from our collections. More information on our collection can be found on our website, and you can search for material on our online database. For more information, or to book a class, please email the Archives: archives@ryerson.ca or Special Collections: specialcollections@ryerson.ca.

Window into A&SC reading room

At the front desk, Daisy and RISIS are waiting to welcome you.

One of our “new” reading room tables, actually used by in a Ryerson Board Room in the 1970’s.

The reading room research materials are now all handily in one spot.

One of the most exciting changes for A&SC staff is the new mobile shelving for the collections. Not only did it double our storage capacity, it is also totally separate from the reading room and offices.

The A&SC staff encourage you to stop by and visit if you get the chance.

 

CLOSING December 9th – Archives and Special Collections is on the move!

Move time is  almost here and the staff here in Archives and Special Collections could not be more excited.

Please note – Archives and Special Collections will be closing at end of day Friday December 9th, 2016 and re-opening Monday January 16th, 2017.

We ask during this time, if you need to contact the Archives or Special Collections to please use email: archives@ryerson.ca and specialcollections@ryerson.ca as our telephones will be in flux during the move.

See you in the new year in our beautiful new space.

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS IS ON THE MOVE!

Doozer construction

Doozer construction sign from the Bob Hackborn fonds 2012.005.06.59

Beginning Monday May 16 Special Collections will be rooming with the Ryerson University Archives while renovations happen on the 4th floor. The Archives is located on the 3rd floor in the Library in room LIB387.

The move will take several weeks to complete, but we will continue to offer reference and research appointments while the shifting takes place.

To access Special Collections please email specialcollections@ryerson.ca for an appointment.

Empty shelving in Special Collections

Fitting, Kodak was Special Collections first fonds and it is the first to relocate to the third floor.

Empty shelving in Special Collections.

Clearing and disassembling of shelves has begun.

Fans of shelves against wall.

Shelves waiting for assemble in the Archives

Kodak ledgers on shelving in Archives

Kodak advertising ledgers in their home

Archival boxes on shelves in Archives.

Doesn’t take long to fill up the shelves.

We are looking forward to an exciting Summer and Fall with A&SC finally located in one place! Check back here for move updates and photographs.

 

“It is most strange to know that the invasion has begun…” Remembrance Day 2015

In 2011 the Ryerson Archives received the Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association Archives. Among the boxes and files was a scrapbook kept by Alumnae President Grace Bolton. In the scrapbook were letters home from the front during World War II. The Association had been sending Christmas boxes and care packages to their Nurses and Doctors serving in Europe and South Africa.

Perhaps the most poignant letter was sent from a Nursing Sister enlisted with the R.C.A.M.C (Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps) from an undisclosed hospital in an undisclosed place in Europe. The letter was written 3 days after D-Day, when Allied forces stormed the Beaches of Normandy.

RG946_01_03_01_15_02.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving overseas, June 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.15

“This is a bit disjointed, but the mess is crowded and noisy, radio blaring, and so difficult for me to concentrate. The censors will not allow me to tell you what I am doing or where I am, but at a later date I will write you about what has taken place when it’s no longer any secret.”

She continues talking about staying overseas instead of going home (she was injured by shrapnel) and discusses the horrors of war on the land and the people.

RG946_01_03_01_15

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving overseas, June 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.15

“It is a great privilege to be in the thick of things in these days. I often think I was foolish not to come home, when I could have done so quite easily, but I know I should never be quite satisfied to be back, before it is finished at least over here. Life in the country is peaceful and very beautiful this time of year. It is most strange to know that the invasion has begun with all its horrors, heartaches and destruction of humanity and cities and buildings, whilst living here. Soon however we will begin to see the results in some of our grand boys who will be coming back to be patched up by us. They are simply magnificent in the way in which they accept the loss of legs and arms.”

Take a moment to pause and remember. Ryerson has a ceremony every November 11 in the Howard Kerr Hall quad by the flag pole.