A Window in Time – 1899

What is that date on the window?

The Archives and Special Collections (A&SC) windows feature a series of seemingly random numbers worked into the window’s graphic pattern. The numbers are actually dates, chosen by ASC staff, that are significant to the City of Toronto, Ryerson University, and Archives and Special Collections. Over the course of the next year our blog will feature some of the window dates and explain their significance.

1899

2005.001.3.259. Canadian Kodak Co., Ltd. Headquarters (1899-1901), 41 Colborne Street, Toronto

In 1899, after successfully operating on the American market for over a decade, George Eastman dispatched Kodak employee John G. Palmer to Toronto to determine the viability of establishing a subsidiary in Canada. Palmer discovered a robust market for photographic products and, on November 8, 1899, Canadian Kodak Co., Limited was incorporated under the Ontario Company’s act. The nascent company established headquarters in downtown Toronto, embarking on a relationship with the city that would last more than a century and would constitute the heart of the company’s manufacturing operations in Canada.

For more information on Kodak Canada, please visit https://library.ryerson.ca/asc/2015/01/kodak-in-toronto-1899-2005-a-century-of-traces/

 

Practical Nursing – nursing notes from The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association fonds

The Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association fonds came to the Ryerson Archives and Special Collections in 2011. In it are several notebooks filled with course notes, and practical knowledge for the student nurse.

One of the notebooks dates to the 1920’s and belonged to Wellesley School of Nursing class of 1925 graduate Elsie Kathleen Jones. Elsie K. returned to The Wellesley in 1928 and became the Director of Nursing in 1937, the role she held until her retirement in 1964.

Elsie K. Jones student notebook (RG 946.03.12.02)

In the notebook there are notations regarding everything from making a proper hospital bed and caring for the sheets, to recognizing and treating a hemorrhage in a patient. The following are some excerpts from the notebook.

“To Make a Closed bed”

To Make a Closed Bed

  • Loosen all the covers, removing one article at a time. Fold and place on a chair
  • Brush mattress well and turn from end to end
  • Place mattress protector on mattress
  • Put on lower sheet, wide hem at top, tucking in nine (9”) at top of mattress drawing tightly and turning straight corners.
  • Place the draw rubber, pulling on tightly, so there are no wrinkles
  • Place draw sheet, folding about 1/3 under at the top and tucking in tightly on each side
  • Place top sheet with the hem wrong side up, first coming to top of bed. Tuck in at the foot and make straight corners
  • Place blanket about 9” from top of the bed. Tuck in at the foot and make straight corners.
  • Then fold top sheet over the blanket and tuck in on both sides
  • Place the spread, reaching to the top of the bed, making straight corner at the bottom.
  • Place two pillows in bed. See that the pillows are well on the corners of the slips. Fold and place with closed end toward the door

The notebook also included instructions on how to make an “Ether” or surgical bed. The following are instructions for making up a surgical tray:

“Surgical dressing tray”

Surgical dressing tray

  1. Six packages of absorbent wipes
  2. Two large and two small dressings
  3. One package of sterile towels
  4. Set of instruments (forceps, scissors, probe)
  5. Adhesive straps
  6. Adhesive tape
  7. Antiseptic powder (Borace or Bismuth Formic Iodide)
  8. Bandages 2” x 3”
  9. Bandage scissors
  10. Curved basin
  11. Sterile doctor’s gloves
  12. Sterile bowl or basin of warm boracic solution
  13. Packing

The nurses were also responsible to pre-treating the bedding if stained before sending them out to be washed:

“Removing stains from bedding”

Removing Stains

Blood stains are soaked in cold water, then washed with soap and tepid water. For tea, coffee, and fruit stains use boiling water. If stains are still very persistent, use a solution of oxalic acid and rinse well afterwards in cold water.

Cocoa or anything containing milk use cold water

Grease stains, use hot water and soap or benzene

Iron Rust – spread over boiling water cover with salt and lemon juice, place in sun, if possible, and rinse thoroughly before sending to laundry

Ink stains – cover with salt and lemon juice and rinse thoroughly

Iodine – use ammonia or alcohol

When it came to treating their patients there were basic instructions such as recognizing sings of and type of fevers and proper care of thermometers:

“Types of Fever and care of thermometer”

 

Care of thermometer

Keep thermometer in bichloride of mercury solution 1-1000. Wash in cold water and dry before giving to patient

Types of Fever

  • Continuous fever which remains high with slight variations
  • Remittent, which remain above normal with considerable variations between highest and lowest temperature
  • Intermittent – alternately rises to high fever and falls to or below normal

The notebook also has a number of recipes for poultices, enemas, purgatives, and various medical solutions used by nurses to treat a variety of medical conditions. The Linseed poultice was used for treating chest congestion and pneumonia:

“Linseed poultice”

Linseed Poultice

Is made from linseed or ground flax seed meal. It is most effectual because it can be used at higher temperatures with blistering, as the linseed contains considerable oil.

Preparation

For a small poultice, use about 2/3 cup of linseed to 1 cup boiling water. Add the linseed slowly to the boiling water, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon or spatula. Turn the gas low and just let come to a boil. Remove from gas and beat vigorously. Spread the linseed about 3/4” thick on poultice gauze leaving a good margin for folding in. Carry to the patient between heated plates. Have ready oiled muslin flannel protector binder and pins

*Note – Linseed poultice must be hot, light and smooth.

To view the notebook in its entirety or look through other items in this fonds – please contact the Ryerson Archives at archives@ryerson.ca.

 

 

 

The New Archives and Special Collections Reading Room is Open for Business!

Now open to all students, staff, faculty!

The new Archives and Special Collections reading room is now open for business. We are now located on the 4th floor of the Library in LIB 404, adjacent to the new quiet study and teaching room, LIB405. The Archives and Special Collections reading room is open from Monday – Friday form 9-5.
Artifacts and exhibits are still being installed, but we are open for visitors and researchers. Here are a few photographs of our new digs.

New Quiet Study Area:

A large quiet study area, LIB405, is now open as well, and is available during library opening hours, but will occasionally be closed for booked classes. Signage will be posted indicating scheduled bookings.

For Instructors and Faculty: Teaching With Archival and Special Collections Material

If you are a teaching a class that might benefit from including primary source material, the quiet study/teaching space can be booked for classes. The archives and special collections staff can work with you to select books, photographs, documents, artifacts or other primary source materials from our collections. More information on our collection can be found on our website, and you can search for material on our online database. For more information, or to book a class, please email the Archives: archives@ryerson.ca or Special Collections: specialcollections@ryerson.ca.

Window into A&SC reading room

At the front desk, Daisy and RISIS are waiting to welcome you.

One of our “new” reading room tables, actually used by in a Ryerson Board Room in the 1970’s.

The reading room research materials are now all handily in one spot.

One of the most exciting changes for A&SC staff is the new mobile shelving for the collections. Not only did it double our storage capacity, it is also totally separate from the reading room and offices.

The A&SC staff encourage you to stop by and visit if you get the chance.

 

CLOSING December 9th – Archives and Special Collections is on the move!

Move time is  almost here and the staff here in Archives and Special Collections could not be more excited.

Please note – Archives and Special Collections will be closing at end of day Friday December 9th, 2016 and re-opening Monday January 16th, 2017.

We ask during this time, if you need to contact the Archives or Special Collections to please use email: archives@ryerson.ca and specialcollections@ryerson.ca as our telephones will be in flux during the move.

See you in the new year in our beautiful new space.

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS IS ON THE MOVE!

Doozer construction

Doozer construction sign from the Bob Hackborn fonds 2012.005.06.59

Beginning Monday May 16 Special Collections will be rooming with the Ryerson University Archives while renovations happen on the 4th floor. The Archives is located on the 3rd floor in the Library in room LIB387.

The move will take several weeks to complete, but we will continue to offer reference and research appointments while the shifting takes place.

To access Special Collections please email specialcollections@ryerson.ca for an appointment.

Empty shelving in Special Collections

Fitting, Kodak was Special Collections first fonds and it is the first to relocate to the third floor.

Empty shelving in Special Collections.

Clearing and disassembling of shelves has begun.

Fans of shelves against wall.

Shelves waiting for assemble in the Archives

Kodak ledgers on shelving in Archives

Kodak advertising ledgers in their home

Archival boxes on shelves in Archives.

Doesn’t take long to fill up the shelves.

We are looking forward to an exciting Summer and Fall with A&SC finally located in one place! Check back here for move updates and photographs.

 

“It is most strange to know that the invasion has begun…” Remembrance Day 2015

In 2011 the Ryerson Archives received the Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association Archives. Among the boxes and files was a scrapbook kept by Alumnae President Grace Bolton. In the scrapbook were letters home from the front during World War II. The Association had been sending Christmas boxes and care packages to their Nurses and Doctors serving in Europe and South Africa.

Perhaps the most poignant letter was sent from a Nursing Sister enlisted with the R.C.A.M.C (Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps) from an undisclosed hospital in an undisclosed place in Europe. The letter was written 3 days after D-Day, when Allied forces stormed the Beaches of Normandy.

RG946_01_03_01_15_02.01

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving overseas, June 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.15

“This is a bit disjointed, but the mess is crowded and noisy, radio blaring, and so difficult for me to concentrate. The censors will not allow me to tell you what I am doing or where I am, but at a later date I will write you about what has taken place when it’s no longer any secret.”

She continues talking about staying overseas instead of going home (she was injured by shrapnel) and discusses the horrors of war on the land and the people.

RG946_01_03_01_15

Letter sent from Nursing Sister serving overseas, June 9, 1944. RG 946.01.03.01.15

“It is a great privilege to be in the thick of things in these days. I often think I was foolish not to come home, when I could have done so quite easily, but I know I should never be quite satisfied to be back, before it is finished at least over here. Life in the country is peaceful and very beautiful this time of year. It is most strange to know that the invasion has begun with all its horrors, heartaches and destruction of humanity and cities and buildings, whilst living here. Soon however we will begin to see the results in some of our grand boys who will be coming back to be patched up by us. They are simply magnificent in the way in which they accept the loss of legs and arms.”

Take a moment to pause and remember. Ryerson has a ceremony every November 11 in the Howard Kerr Hall quad by the flag pole.

Looking back – celebrating the classes of 1950, 1955, 1960, and 1965.

This Saturday October 3rd, Ryerson is hosting is annual alumni weekend activities. This year the feature years are the classes of 1950, 1955, 1960, 1965, 1975, 1990, and 2005. In celebration of this the Archives decided to look back at those years and see what was happening on campus. This two part blog starts by looking at the classes of 1950, 1955, 1960, and 1965.  For more information about Alumni Weekend click here.

 

Yearbook_1950

 

 

In the school year 1949-1950 Bud Evans and “Honest” John Vail were the SAC presidents, and Ted Toogood was appointed as the Athletic Director. There were 390 day school and 1355 evening school student were enrolled. The first “At Home” dance was held.

Ryerson’s First “At Home” Dance held in the gymnasium (Ryersonia yearbook 1950)

List of Faculty members (Ryersonia yearbook 1950)

Ryerson Faculty and Staff, circa 1949. (History Documentation file, 1949)

RIOT was held for the first time on March 3.

RIOT 1950 football sketch featuring Ted Toogood as “Coach Nogood”. (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1950)

CJRT began broadcasting on November 1st, and the first live T.V. show in Canada was broadcast from Ryerson on November 14th.

First live Canadian Television Broadcast at Ryerson, November 1949. [Ryersonia Yearbook, 1950)

Most significantly Ryerson graduated its first class of 212 graduates on Friday May 12. Click here for Principal Howard Kerr’s commencement address.

 

1955

 

In the school year 1954-1955 the Blue and Gold Ball was held on February 16th at the Royal York Hotel, and RIOT ’55 was titled “Ghouls and Dolls”. The Ryerson Opera Workshop (ROW) staged Mademoiselle Angot in the Bloor Collegiate auditorium.

Blue and Gold Ball, 1955 (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1955)

ROW ’55 – Mademoiselle Angot (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1955)

“The Ryerson Story” – a CBC TV film presentation directed by Rollo Gamble of the NFB and commentated by Lloyd Bochner – was filmed at Ryerson. It featured many Ryerson students and highlighted Ryerson’s various programs. It aired on February 20th.

Ryersonian article, dated January 19, 1955, about the filming of the Ryerson Story. (History 1955 documentation file)

Photograph of Lloyd Bochner with Ryerson students. Clockwise from top left: Margo McGregor, Gerry Farkas, Vicky Jory, Lloyd Bochner, and Bill Burrows RTA ’56. (RG 95.1)

And on May 6th, 1955 Ryerson graduated 365 students from the following programs: Architectural Technology; Business Administration; Secretarial Science; Electrical Technology; Electronic Technology; Radio and Television Arts; Fashion; Furniture and Interior Design; Journalism; Printing Management; Instrument Technology; Research Technology; Public Health Laboratory Technology; Laboratory Technology; Hotel, Resort, and Restaurant Administration; Home Economics; Childhood Management; Mechanical Technology; Metallurgical Technology; Tool Design and Technology; and Photographic Arts.

1955 Convocation program of event

 

1960

 

In the school year 1959-1960 Bruce Dobbs was the SAC President. RIOT 1960 was held at the Riverside Auditorium November 18th-21st.

Photographs from RIOT and ROW. (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1960)

The Blue and Gold Ball was held on February 5th, crowning Joan Fujimoto as Miss Ryerson and Papa and Mama Wycik as Mr. & Mrs. Ryerson.

February 11th, 1950 edition of the Ryersonian newspaper.

The second unit of Howard Kerr Hall was taken over by Ryerson.

March 9th, 1960 edition of the Ryersonian Newspaper.

Convocation for 516 graduates was held May 6th at Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.

Graduation at Yorkminster Church (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1960)

The Graduation banquet was held on the evening of May 5th. The Gold and Silver medalists were presented with their awards during the dinner.

Awards Night programme (RG 4.04.01.11)

Lynn Fournier, Molly Copus, Howard Kerr, and Bruce Dobbs at the graduation banquet after receiving their medals. (Ryersonia Yearbook, 1960)

 

1965

 

The school year 1964-1965 saw some major changes at Ryerson – the first being its name.

A 1963-1964 and a 1964-1965 course calendar showing the change in the school’s name.

Open House held October 24 – the same weekend as Homecoming.

Wednesday October 14th, 1964 edition of the Ryersonian newspaper.

The clock tower on South Kerr Hall get carillon bells. Wayne Detcher played the bells for the first time during a Christmas Carol concerts over the lunch hour in December.

Carillon bells in Kerr Hall Clock Tower. January 12th, 1965 edition of the Ryersonian

Ryerson’s annual graduation banquet was held April 8th

Graduation banquet menu and programme of events (RG 4.04.01.16)

Ryerson also changed its coat-of-arms late in the year.

Old coat of arms

New coat of arms, adopted in March or April of 1965

And finally graduation was held May 7th with a morning and an afternoon ceremony.

Convocation programme, Friday May 7th, 1965 (RG 76.04.01.16)

Convocation photographs (Ryersonia, 1965)

We hope you enjoyed this brief journay down memory lane – For more information on these years stop by the Archives (LIB387) on Saturday October 3rd and visit our Anniversary display. We will be open 11:00am to 2:00pm.

Next month we will look at the classes of 1975, 1990, and 2005

 

 

Points of Interest from the Collections – The Creation of the Archives part deux

To round out the month looking back at the creation of the Archives, We have discovered the first Archives report dated June 29, 1971.

It was interesting reading for Archives staff as it answered questions about the collection and how it was filed and stored.  It also delves into the beginning of the retention of objects as a way to preserve Ryerson’s history along side the textual and published materials.

To view the report click on the picture below:

A report of the Ryerson Archives by James Peters Archivist for President Donald Mordell June 29, 1971

Many of the items mentioned in the report are on display or in open storage in the current Archives reading room. This includes Egerton Ryerson’s desk and bust, The Ryersonian and Eyeopener newspapers, and the course calendars.

We encourage you to stop by the Archives and take a walk through Ryerson’s history.

 

Points of Interest from the Collections – The Creation of the Archives

For the month of August, Archives and Special Collections will blog bi-weekly with points of interest from our collections.

This week we look at documents connected to the birth of the Archives at Ryerson.

In 1970 Ryerson Polytechnical Institute invited Professor D. McCormack Smyth to conduct a study of the structure of government at Ryerson.  The Smyth Commission Report was published and its 7th recommendation was the creation of an institutional Archives.

Page from report stating that an Archives be established to preserve historical documents.

Recommendation No. 7 – Smyth Commission report

On November 11, 1970 Ryerson President Donald Mordell sent out the following memo to all Deans, Chairmen, and Department heads.

Page 1 of the memo from Donald Mordell. Outlines what materials should be kept and asking people not to throw anything away until a system was in place to sort through the items to determine whether or not they were Archival.

Page 1 – November 11, 1970 memorandum

Page 2 of Mordell memo - Library will be storing the potential Archival material until a proper system is in place. He asks people to properly mark the materials.

Page 2 – November 11, 1970 memorandum

 

On November 17, 1970 Mordell sent the following memo to Jim Peters, a professor in the Department of English:

Donald Mordell memo to Jim Peters - thanking him for his suggestions and asking him if he would be interested in taking the position of Archivist.

Memo from Donald Mordell to Jim Peters

The Archives was officially established in 1971 as a special new department associated with the Library. Jim Peters was appointed Ryerson’s first Archivist.

Technikos magazine article announcing the establishment of Ryerson's Archives within the Library with Jim Peters as the Archivist.

Technikos magazine, Spring 1971

To learn more about the Archives and see what we have in our collections drop by. The Archives are open Monday – Friday from 9:00am t0 4:00pm.